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Discussion Starter #1
Who can tell me the best way to tie down a 2003 GL1800 on a transport trailer. I assume the passenger handholds are used but what about the handlebars or front forks. All info will be appreciated. :)
 

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Using soft ties, tie to the lower triple tree angled towards the front, at this location the straps are pulling forward and down, at the rear, remove the side covers and tie to the frame, do not tie to the bag guards or passenger hand grips, they are not designed to carry a load, and if you rip them off it will be very expensive to repair. Some will say it won't hurt to tie to those items, they have done it before, but there are others who have had this happen, Lewis at Electrical Connection has said it happened to him.


 

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I have used the engine guards and bag guards to tie off of with no problem and transported a Wing a couple of hundred miles that way.

My only observation is that that is how the bikes come from the factory in their shipping crates - lashed down by the guards. Make sure that the front wheel is lashed securely to the front of the trailer, then use the engine and bag guards with the soft ties.
 

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The photos I have seen, the bikes come from the factory bolted to the shipping crate, there is neither compresson or extension forces on the guards in the crates. The engine and bag guards are designed to resist a force pushing up, not down, they aren't designed to resist downward forces at all, and that is exactly what you have when you tie down a bike. Over the last few years there have been several people mention having the bag guards or passenger handles torn off while trailering.

Lewis at Electrical Connection tows his bike all over the country going to shows, he has said that he used to tie to the guards till they were ripped right off the bike while on the trailer, he now advises to never tie to those points.
 

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"Using soft ties, tie to the lower triple tree angled towards the front, at this location the straps are pulling forward and down, at the rear, remove the side covers and tie to the frame, do not tie to the bag guards or passenger hand grips, they are not designed to carry a load, and if you rip them off it will be very expensive to repair. Some will say it won't hurt to tie to those items, they have done it before, but there are others who have had this happen, Lewis at Electrical Connection has said it happened to him. "

The Gold Book RECOMMENDS using the passenger grips to tie the rear down, not the frame. I've done it many times with the passenger grips with no problems. The guard rails are a seperate issue as they're designed for UP loads (as in when the bike falls over) not DOWN loads. And, I might add, the do their job quite nicely. Don't ask me how I know this.
 

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I use soft ties on the triple tree in the front and soft ties on the passenger grab handles in the rear.

I secure the bike mainly with the front tie downs. The rear I use to keep the bike in a steady upright position, pulling the ratchet tie downs forward. The higher you can tie, the steadier the bike will be.

I've towed many thousands of miles this way and never a problem! I think this is what the GWRRA Gold Book recommends also.


Yep, the trailer is a 9' Chariot Sled! Built in Oldmar, Fl.

 

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Trailer Tie Down

I use a MCK1 Tie Down System purchased through Magneta Trailers. It's great for me. Holds the front wheel in a cage and utilizes ratchet straps to give no movement. I do use soft ties off the passenger handles pulling down and forward to the trailer tie eyes. With this system there seems to be no "real" stress on the handles. I also use soft ties off the front crash bars pulling down and forward just for that extra feeling of security (they are probably not needed, but it just gives me a better feeling). I also use "Quickie" pulleys (3/8") for making everything a little faster. They work great and have never slipped. Also, the people at Magneta Trailers are fantastic especially Diane in customer service. magnetatrailers.com
GW
 

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Wingman26 wrote:
The photos I have seen, the bikes come from the factory bolted to the shipping crate, there is neither compresson or extension forces on the guards in the crates. The engine and bag guards are designed to resist a force pushing up, not down, they aren't designed to resist downward forces at all, and that is exactly what you have when you tie down a bike. Over the last few years there have been several people mention having the bag guards or passenger handles torn off while trailering.

Well Wingman, I might be all wrong, but when my buddy and I went to HDL in Shadyside early this year to pick up his new '03 IB, all of the bikes in the crates in the storage yard were lashed to their pallets/crates using bright blue 1" ratchet-type straps on the guards (his bike was not assembled yet, so we had to go through the ones in the storage yard to pick one out. Why it wasn't assembled is another story...). And once the bike was prepped that's how the folks at HDL loaded the bike to the trailer.

Maybe we were just stupid lucky. Or both. :wink:
 

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Chatiott trailer Tie down timps

Chariott makes a great trailer and their site has tips on how to tie anything down.
http://www.chariot-trailer.com/biketie.htm

While I dream of owning a Chariott trailer, I did purchase the front wheel chock and soft ties from this site and used them to trailer an 86 Yamaha Venture across country in a 4X8 box trailer with great success.
 

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Just call me curious - how can Honda design the crash bars in the rear to "work" for pushing, as in falling over, but not "work" for pulling, as in using a tie down. Also, as stated by others, this is the way Honda ships their bikes - tied down front and rear by the crash bars.

I hauled a Yamaha Venture all over the country for 3 years (20K Miles) in a pickup being pulled by my motorhome. All of these miles were done using the rear crash guards as the tie down point for the rear of the bike.

Maybe the design of the GL1800 rear crash bars are "unique"?

JB
 
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