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Never towed the gl before, I hate the thought, but it looks like I'll need to this fall, looking for tips and advice, trailer is an open flat bed with a long ramp, like from tractor supply.
I read thru how to tie it down correctly but looking for any other insights.

thanks
david
 

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Double up on the soft ties. 8 soft ties and 4 rachet tiedowns. Get the ones that are at least 2 inches wide.

Stop and tighten the rachet tie downs after the first 20 miles. Then do the same at each rest stop.

Travel with the gas tank nearly empty.....reduces side sway and rocking.

Install a good chock on the flat bed trailer.

Do not go too fast on the exit curves because the bike is very top heavy....especially if the gas tank is full.


:thumbup:
 

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Don't use tip over bars as tie down point. Recommend that you use frame and bottom end of fork tree. And, like Grampa sed, check the straps often.
 

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I do use the crash bars for tie downs, so far 3000 miles and no problems. I also use the Condor Chock, well worth the money.

I check the tension on the straps after 10 miles and typically need to tighten them down. I've towed my VTX and now my Wing for a total of 7 years and the worst part is seeing that bike for the first time in the rear view mirror and worrying about her, fortunately, I am past that paranoia now.
 

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Is the ramp wide enough that you can put your feet down or walk beside? Once the front wheel starts up your feet won't touch the ground. Don't try to ride it up or down. Much better to walk it, either on it or beside which was my preference.
 

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Never towed the gl before, I hate the thought, but it looks like I'll need to this fall, looking for tips and advice, trailer is an open flat bed with a long ramp, like from tractor supply.
I read thru how to tie it down correctly but looking for any other insights.

thanks
david
Just having done this I can tell you that your seedometer needle can be jarred over the pin. After taking my bike off a trailer it had the needle behind the stop peg. Had to take off the front to get to it and reset it. Worked fine but something to look out for when you get to your destination.
 

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It is not a good idea to use the engine and saddlebag guards for tie down points. They are designed to resist upward force as in a tip over not a pull down and they are to near the ground. Many have suffered snapped off mounting bolts. This also leaves a lot of bike weight above them to act as leverage putting additional stress on the straps and tie down points. Best to use the front forks above the triple tree and the frame behind the painted side covers.
 

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The worst thing about trailering a wing on open railer is people busting your balls .Its not a harley why arentr you riding it and that came from some harley guys on the highway at 65 mph.
 

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Don't even try to cover it if it is on an open trailer.
excellent point - I forgot to mention this in my post. I did read about a guy who wrapped his motorcycle using one of those large machines they use to wrap large pallets of stuff. He said it worked fine.

Anything other than that will whip in the wind and most definitely mar the paint.
 

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I towed mine from Tennessee to Utah and back in July. I used the straps over the front fork brace on each side in the front and tied to the rear crash bars in the back. I did this because when I intstalled my fuse block I put it near the stock fuse block. That left me no place to go around the frame there.

I left the sidestand down and slightly tightened the strap on that side first. If you tighten the right side first you can tip the bike over. If it tips to the left it just lands on the side stand. I tightened the ratchet straps until the front "squated" about an inch.

I checked it after a couple of miles and at the first fuel stop. The only thing I had to mess with was the loose ends of the ratchet straps. Towed 1700 miles each way with no problems. I rode it on and off the trailer. The trailer had a tailgate the same width as the trailer.
 

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Use a Condor chock or similarly well made chock. I ratchet the front wheel to the chock in additon to other tie down points.

Lesson learned. Just take my word for it!!!!
 

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I don't recommend using the crash bars for tie down points. Not a good idea. Some have probably been successful doing this, but it really isn't the best place.
 

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David,

I bought a enclosed trailer to tow the wing. From this site I was giving the recommendation for the Wheeldock chock. I bought it, have used it for 6000 miles of towing the wing. I don't strap the forks with this chock, no need.

If the link that was posted is the one that shows how to strap the bike. When you put the bike into the Wheeldock and activate the lock. Tightening the straps placed on the frametube in the middle of the bike will compress the forks, I pull it tight enough to still have some fork travel.
And I use straps on the rear frame tubing pulling towards the rear of the bike. Once you've done that, the bike is going nowhere.

The Wheeldock is well worth the money.

Mike
 

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In addition to the method posted above by Fredgarvin, might I also suggest to make sure the bike is in nuteral while tied down.
 

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tie down

iuse the ratchet tie downs on the frame as well as dolly wheels attachet to the the rear guards.the tie just keep it from rolling back and forth on a trailer or in my truck bed
 
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