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I would like to put my music that is on vinyl(L.P.s) to C.D.s. Is there a device to do this?
 

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get a turntable and cables that will let you plug it into your audio input of your computer (you may need to take the turntable audio output to an amp, then to your computer if you can not get enough volume) Then do a web search for any of the number of audio recorder software that is out there, I use one called "I-Sound", there is one called "Audacity" some are free some cost 10-20 bucks. What they do is, allow you to record ANY sound that your computer makes (as in, music from its speakers) and save it as any of a number of files formats like MP3, WAV you get the idea. I've done it with lots of my old music.
Rick :wink:
 

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The Set up Rick described works great.

I did 60 LP's and 54 Cassettes. However, heres the problem.

If you want a quality product when you are done there is a lot of additional work. Let me give you some examples.

Lets say you have an LP with 8 songs per side.

When you play the LP thru the setup you are going to play the side complete into your hard drive. What you end up with will be a single file with 8 songs on it. Now that not a problem.

BUT, now you have to split the single track into 8 seperate tracks.

This is not a big problem. The real problem will be the quality of the music you record in off the LP.

Most LP's were recorded in analog or non-digital dolby. If you played the LP alot you will have clicks, hiss, noise or as we say a lot of (snap krackel and pop)

Also the lead in's and track track ends will be to short or to long. So now you have to edit each track to get rid of the noise and set the track spacing correctly.

Give you an example. I had a box collection of 14 LP's my son gave me in the mid 80's. Some of the LP's I never played and were still in the cellophane wrappers.

When I recorded them in you could here the rice krispies, because that was the recording technology at the time.

So I spent a winter when the snow flies recording in, cleaning the noise, editing and creating CD's along with the original album art.

They came out great, but a hugh amount of work. I did it because I enjoy creating stuff.

When you get to cassettes sometimes its more work. Because the stuff is recorded on mylar tape which gets brittle or stretched after a lot of playing and age.

However, if you have a lot of time, like sound editing and fooling around, with this stuff you can get a reasonable product at the end. Just takes a lot of time to do it right.

I have over 1165 CD's worth of music, recorded, editied and volume adjusted converted to MP3/WMA and ready to play on the bike.

The most importatnt part is that I also need serious medication, LOL
 

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How do you split the one big file into seperate tracks? I too have several audiophile LPs that I would like to have on digital format but I do not want to manually cue every track.
 

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You guys may want to just download the songs you really want that are on the vinyl records and not screw around with the conversion. Count how many songs you really want to have and weight that vs. all the BS and time your gonna spend on converting everything over to digital format. It takes a long time to do it when you know what you are doing. If you don't know what you are doing, it will take a VERY long time plus you get to scratch your head and try and fix the goofups. Kinda sounds like working on a Goldwing doesn't it. Downloading music is waaaay too easy. Just about any teenager can show you how. :lol: Now if your songs on the records are way old, the download idea just might not work as they may not be popular/available.
 

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What Joel said. I did convert a few LP's, I have over 4,000 mp3's now, but when I could find most of them on CD for a few bucks the time savings and the better sound made it worth while for me just to buy the CD's and rip them.
 

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A lot of the stuff you have I LP's if they are older you might on find on dowloads or P2P sharing thats why in some cases you might not have a choice.

But to other comments made. If you are looking at older stuff you might find the tunes, but even ripping CD's can be a problem. Each piece of software handles the ripping process differently.

Some add silence in the front some in the back and some in both places etc etc.

As an example, I don't need songs with 10 second fadeouts. So I edit the tracks and make sure I don't have much more than 3.5 sec's of silence at the end of each song. A lot of this is all personal preference, some people don't care, some people don't want to take the time to do all the work.

I for one don't like listening to songs I want to hear the whole album. So I edit all the songs and wrap them into one file.

The one file is the whole album editied, sound adjusted and converted to a smaller file.

But I have been doing this so long, to me its no big deal.

If I even rip a new CD, I may not like the way the sound editor did the track, so I may re-edit it to the way that fits my criteria,

Like I said, I need medication, but it is also a hobby for me.
 

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dchance said:
What Joel said. I did convert a few LP's, I have over 4,000 mp3's now, but when I could find most of them on CD for a few bucks the time savings and the better sound made it worth while for me just to buy the CD's and rip them.
That's fine. But for me, a lot of my old LP's are out of print and either never were re-released on CD, or have gone out of print again. I guess it's my own fault for having strange tastes in music...
 

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Splitting tracks:

Go to this hyperlink

http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cach...+"split+audio+tracks&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=4

This describes a piece of software that is free. It is called audacity I use it all the time.

The software will do a lot of things including track splits. I use the software in a different way described in the link but I use it as a primary editor for fades, adding or cutting time on the track etc.

The trick is to start with an mp3 file, so when you are recording either record it in as an MP3 or have the abilty to convert the single file to an MP3 before you start the process.
 

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I have been doing this for quite some time as well. I generally use Roxio, as it will let you set up the program in advanced settings to detect a pause, and when it does it creates a new track. Works really well most of the time. You have to enable the feature and set how long of a pause you would like before it creates the new track.

Willy
 

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new jersey lefty said:
I would like to put my music that is on vinyl(L.P.s) to C.D.s. Is there a device to do this?
You don't say, but I am assuming you do not currently have a turntable and have to get one. If you already do, this may still help in determining what you need to do your hookup.

Turntables have two different levels of outputs. We all remember the old phono inputs on the back of our receivers. Those inputs had an extra pre-amp stage in them so that the low output of most cartridges could be brought up to the same level as your CD player and cassette deck. (Some cartridges were high output moving coil designs, but they are rare and you probably won't come across one. They were rare even in the days before CD.)

Many of the few turntables that are left on the market today have switchable preamps in them so that they can be plugged into a receiver that doesn't have phono inputs. The reason this is important is that those receiver inputs require the same input level as the audio card on your computer.

The problem is that the only turntables that have preamp outputs are mostly junk. With higher quality turntables you will have to buy an external pre-amp, which you can probably get on E-bay for about $5. Buying a phono preamp will allow you to hook your turntable directly to the sound card.

It is easy to fall into the trap that says "Hey, I am only transferring music once. I don't need something that will last". But considering the amount of time you are going to invest in the transfer, you may as well get the best sound you can out of your LPs. I would look on Ebay for a Technics direct drive model. They actually still make them today as they are popular with DJs. Stay away from that piece of junk Sony model that Best Buy, Circuit City, and others sell. It costs about $135 and is worth about $10

Invest the time and money to make sure the audio going into the audio card is the best quality possible. Although software can remove many noises, along with it comes some loss in fidelity. Vinyl does degrade over time, but there are additives that can be put on the LP to reduce the noise, ticks, and pops.
 

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What Larry says is good advice. I was fortunate to have a couple of friends that had some equipment they didn't need or want anymore. One had a turn table and the other an amp.

I hadn't used some of this stuff in years, at the start I had some issues to solve, like why wasn't I getting enough volume out of the setup.

Until I realized I forgot to ground the equipment. Also most have RCA plugs not a staright earphone cable. So you have to buy a RCA cable that joins into a earphone cable with the right jack to fit your sound card.

Non of this is a big deal, but takes a lot of fiddeling around until you get the setup correct along with the setting on the pre-amp eqalizer.

Then after the music is recorded the fun starts.

The bottom line is that this is really a manufacturing process.

Raw Material (LP)

Machine tools (TT & Amp)

Finishing Process (Sound editing software)

Finished goods(CD)

This is a good snow fall project.

However once you get the first few done the rest is easy, its the R&D and setup time thats a big pain
 

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Some sort of sound editing software is helpful, too. I use Cool Edit Pro, made by a company called Syntrillium. The company was bought out by Adobe, and the software is now available under the name of Audition, I believe.

In any case, one thing I like about it is that it has some really good noise filters, which enable you to remove clicks and pops, and even background noise.

But the main thing is to get a good turntable. Mine's mediocre, and that fact has caused me to waste a lot of time.
 

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Try this:
CD Spin Doctor®

* Convert your music for iMovie and iPhoto projects
* Record live events using your built-in microphone
* Record your own podcast and encode with iTunes!

CD Spin Doctor® helps you to digitize analog audio from your vinyl LPs or tapes. You can define tracks, reduce noise and enhance sound quality with included filters, and add the audio to your iTunes library with ease. This application is perfect for rediscovering your classic collection of LPs and cassettes, recording live performances, sermons or lectures, and creating your own podcasts!
 

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I intentionally did not get into software because there have been many new introductions since I last did this type of encoding, but I can throw in another thought to consider.

Try and decide ahead of time all the uses you may have for this audio. If all you care about is throwing MP3s on your Ipod and won't use them anywere else, this won't matter much.

Because this is such a time consuming project, you have to consider the format you want to encode in. Generally the higher the quality, the larger the file size. Although I put my files on my Ipod in mp3 format, that is not what I originally did the encoding in. I used the standard WAV format, which is a totally lossless format encoded in PCM, which is what CDs are endoded at. This is the highest quality encoding you can get. I archived these files on CDRs and use them to rip to other formats when I need them. This creates an extra step, but at least it guarantees that you have as close a perfect original as you can get.

WMA9 VBR was released, which is another lossless format that results in a much smaller file size. I would have used this if it existed back then. The sound quality is just as impressive as the WAV format.

MP4 is a high quality format (if you use a high enough bit rate) that is only widely accepted in the Ipod community. I don't think I would want this as my permanent archive format.

Ogg Vorbis is even better than MP4, and the encoders are free, but I worry about whether this will still be an accepted format 10 years from now.

Mp3 is obviously the most popular, but is also generally the worst quality. If you record at 160kbps or VBR, you can still get generally high quality audio. Using this format will also result in the least labor spent down the road because you won't have to mess with multiple file types and you will have less file storage issues. Keep in mind that most home and car CD players will not play VBR encoded MP3's, so if you want to be able to just copy the files and play them, use the 160kbps setting.

I won't make a recomendation on which is the best to use, because everyone's needs and goals are different in a project like this. Just give it some serious consideration so that you aren't smacking yourself down the road.
 
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