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Never rode in Mexico, but I remember I worked with a guy that got a job transfer down there and rode his cycle down.
He left us weekly e-mails on his trip. I remember him saying the roads in certain area's were sand and gravel, and rough driving.
Some places down farther in Mexico was hard to find good gas. Also nobody moves over to let you pass on their roads.
 

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Check w/your insurance agent before you cross the border !!!!!!!!!
I had to travel into Mexico for my job before I retired.
I was always told, if you have an accident and the vehicle can still be driven, drive away and back to the USA ASAP. If the vehicle cannot be driven and you can leave, do so.
I always used a rental while in Mexico!
If you get jailed there, most likely someone will have to bribe you out. Last I knew, the going rate was around $5,000.
Also, you are taking a risk as to getting good gasoline or not only a few miles from the border.
 

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Don dooo et!
 

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Stay away. Bad roads, bad gasoline, corrupt police. Need Mexican insurance. Unless you just gotta see it, I would stay in the good ole U. S. of A.
 

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I would check with the nearest Mexican consulate to see what they require for entry and travel, If you can’t find one in Shreveport, El Paso will have one for sure. Mexican insurance is a must. What ever you do don’t take any firearm or ammo into Mexico you will go to jail.
 

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Don't bother

Don't bother going south from Tucson. Nogales is a sh1t hole. Worse than ever before. The US customs agents are assholes and hassle you for everything.

And it is accurate that Mexico is a corrupt country. If you don't speak spanish you are especially screwed.

And "go to jail' in Mexico is a different concept.
 

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I ride more miles in a year than most people do in a month.


HUH??????????????????????????
Guess that's ok but I ride more in a month than most do in a year.
 

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go to Alpine drop down follow 90 to DelRio travel Texas border roads stay out of Mexico
 

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I travel into Mexico fairly often. First of all, all guns are illeagle for you to carry into Mexico, not just anything larger than a .38cal. Mexican insurance is a must as they will consider you automatically at fault and impound your vehicle if you are in an accident without it. Be sure to ride with a buddy, as it is not a good place to be a loaner. The more you are with, the better off you are. I have never had a problem with the gas, traffic, or the locals. You will find some sand on the roads in some places, but I've driven on worse. Don't get out of eyesight of your bikes, and always secure them well if you do. Other than that, it is a great place to visit. Great people, food, and a different culture then here in the states. Have fun!



White Boy said:
Myself and a buddy of mine are riding to L.A. via I-20 from Louisiana which intersects I-10 just east of El Paso. We were discussing jumping into Mexico at this point and detouring about 100 miles into unknown waters before re-entering the U.S. into New Mexico and then heading west again on I-10.
Having never done this I would like to know is this an advisable deal, is there a reason why we should or should not try it, do we need a passport, and is there anything else we should do?
I traveled into Tijuana some 20 years ago and no passport was required, but I don't know what if anything has changed since. I'm sure it has.
Thanks for your help on this one.
 

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I travel into Mexico fairly often. First of all, all guns are illeagle for you to carry into Mexico, not just anything larger than a .38cal. Mexican insurance is a must as they will consider you automatically at fault and impound your vehicle if you are in an accident without it. Be sure to ride with a buddy, as it is not a good place to be a loaner. The more you are with, the better off you are. I have never had a problem with the gas, traffic, or the locals. You will find some sand on the roads in some places, but I've driven on worse. Don't get out of eyesight of your bikes, and always secure them well if you do. Other than that, it is a great place to visit. Great people, food, and a different culture then here in the states. Have fun!
I agree 100 percent with the above. I travel in Mexico quite often, Ensenada, San Carlos, San Felipe, Puerto Penasco, although I do not stay in border towns. They all are higher percentage of trouble. In other words, go to a destination such as a port or larger city.

I've found roads good, fuel fine, and food is outstanding. Look for the most local people around a taco stand..that's the one to eat at, then watch what people are getting. Get that. Most hotels have security. They will watch your bike for free, however I always tip they guy a five or so the next morning. (the night before if i'm only staying one night.)

Do not have a weapon (gun). Do have Mexican Insurance. If you are involved in an accident in Mexico, they make sure you are able to meet your obligations, prior to releasing you or your vehicle. Insurance is the ticket to stay out of jail.

My two cents = If you don't plan to go far into Mexico and are curious, park on this side and walk over, have fun and walk back. There are usually guarded parking lots on this side near border towns. Nogales is a blast, park at Ed's for 4 bucks. Includes a free soda when you return. Eat at ElVira's near the fence. Best Mole anywhere.
 

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White Boy said:
Myself and a buddy of mine are riding to L.A. via I-20 from Louisiana which intersects I-10 just east of El Paso. We were discussing jumping into Mexico at this point and detouring about 100 miles into unknown waters before re-entering the U.S. into New Mexico and then heading west again on I-10.
Having never done this I would like to know is this an advisable deal, is there a reason why we should or should not try it, do we need a passport, and is there anything else we should do?
I traveled into Tijuana some 20 years ago and no passport was required, but I don't know what if anything has changed since. I'm sure it has.
Thanks for your help on this one.
I have ridden about 50,000 miles in Mexico on a moto in the past 12 years. What you really should do is postpone this crossing until you have more time and do it right. The border towns are the worse in Mexico and I try and get at least 200-300 miles south of the border the 1st day. You won't find much enjoyment IMHO on the route above. Also like a couple of posters noted NO GUNS don't even have a single bullet !!!! As of this date you don't need a passport but I would have a certified copy of my birth cert. on board. This will be the one with the seal from your county recorder office not the one with your little feet print stamp in ink ! In addition to the border crossing if you go very far south of the border you will need a visa and a temp import permit for your bike. This use to be about 15-20 miles into Mexico but now with NAFTA it goes a bit deeper. If and when you hit one of these without proper above papers you have a problem. Again your American insurance is NO GOOD in old Mex. They don't ask to see your proof of insurance when crossing in but you go straight to jail without it if you have a wreck. You see the way the Mexican police deal with a wreck, is to take everybody to jail, sort it all out and only those with insurance and perhaps a few good old American green backs (for their weekend plans) get to go home ! Really Mexico is a great trip I love it down there take a couple of weeks sometime and enjoy it. Also if you have a loan on your scooter most banks and credit unions won't permit you to leave the US into Mexico. Again to get a permit or license for your bike to drive it in Mexico they want to see your title. Really weird I know but I think you can see this should not be treated lightly. This is why there are several companies who make a good living taking groups in Mexico. Problem is for the most part 15 miles into Mexico is the same as 1500.
 

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Traveling to "Ole Mex"

I couldn't agree more about the insurance and no guns when going down to Mexico. The level of corruption, crime, and violence along the border is not a small thing and it is not getting any better.

I guess the question that comes to mind most is why would you even bother? The reputation that precedes any ride down there when entering from the U.S. except for the beach resorts where you fly down makes it very unappealing. There are many that have ridden there and had a great time, but that country and in particular that border is so unstable and unpredictable, again, why bother? There is a big difference from the border areas and deeper in-country, but you still have to go through the border areas.

I have been all over the world and have been in some pretty ugly and nasty places (makes 3rd world look like Disney), but you know, I ride for the fun and enjoyment of seeing and going to different places without having to worry about going to jail for an accident and having to bribe my way out, or butt head border guards, or bad gas, bad water, whatever. Too much hassle and too much even thinking about all the intangibles associated with riding in Mexico are enough to say, "why bother?" IMHO :)
 

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Why risk anything or your life to go down there.
They try so hard to get up here, must be something wrong down there.
There is so much here that you might not have seen.
If you go good luck you will need it.
Long ago my best friend and I were there and a mexican cop held
us up for all our money. Now I am 6' 2" and then 280 Lbs. but the
357 he stuck in my buddies ear was huge. It just took $165 and I'll
not go back.
 

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Doug 44 hit it on the head with all the info. Me and the wife left MN and drove all the way down to Cabo thru the Baja California not one issue with gas, police, military or the people. Yes bad roads & gas can be scarce plus expect to cross road block with the military looking for drugs.
We speak no Spanish still able to communicate with the Mexicans. Board towns stay away that is where most of the trouble is.

Jamie
 

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I had a buddy who went into mexico from San Diego on his bike (this was years back, so may not be accurate anymore) with two others. They got into a minor crash but one of his riding partners banged his head pretty bad. He asked someone to call an ambulance. They didn't have them. No EMS anywhere near the town they were in. They thought the buddy was going to bleed to death. It all worked out, but they had to ride him to a clinic many miles away. No EMS can be bad mojo after a bike wreck.............
 

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Last May/June I was in a group of 4 bikes and we went into Baja California.

Crossing southbound - no hassle at all. We did not even have to stop at the border - we all got the green light to proceed right on.

We all DID get Mexican insurance before crossing.

Some pointers: Roads and maps are not as well marked as you are used to. We tried (and failed) to find a marked highway on our way north.

Traffic is worse than the Las Vegas freeways (if that is possible!) as everybody seems to be willing to squeeze into any ten foot gap between you and the car in front. (in Vegas it's any space of about 11 feet.)

Also, watch the roads. I'm ridden on hundreds miles of gravel and mud (north, north to Alaska...) so a little sand and gravel does not bother me too much. However in Mexico there is something worse. We were on a newly paved and smooth section of highway going around a very gentle right hand curve and I was admiring the sights. When I look forward again there was a two foot pot-hole dead centre of my lane. I missed it by about ten inches, but the bad part was it had to be about eight to ten inches deep. If we had hit that I'm sure we would've done down, damaged the bike or, most likley, BOTH.

So, if riding in Mexico keep an eye on the road at least five seconds ahead. If you can't see that far due to trafic or curves then have a heightened awareness of the dangers.

Crossing northbound into the US involved a ten minute wait in line. Very hot in the sun. But when I got the the customs guy and he saw my Canadian flag and found out I was from British Columbia he just asked a few questions about fishing on the BC coast. (I suggested he try to get a Vancouver Airport posting and come see for himself.)

Oh, and if you pack heavy-duty rain gear like us Canadians, people will think you've come from another continent, and the long way around at that.
 

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JustRalph said:
I had a buddy who went into mexico from San Diego on his bike (this was years back, so may not be accurate anymore) with two others. They got into a minor crash but one of his riding partners banged his head pretty bad. He asked someone to call an ambulance. They didn't have them. No EMS anywhere near the town they were in. They thought the buddy was going to bleed to death. It all worked out, but they had to ride him to a clinic many miles away. No EMS can be bad mojo after a bike wreck.............
Mexico is nothing to play with ! On one trip into the Baja near Mulege on the main paved road I came upon a wreck that had just happened. The road had just been re-oiled and sand and gravel spread on top. A young lady in a Mazda 626 hit a Ford F-150 head on. The truck had a topper on it filled with kids and she was alone. I watched this young lady bleed to death (which took over 2 hours) while everyone there tired their best. No EMT's and finally a passer by stopped and took the kids to her home for medical attention. We are spoiled here really in the USA we take SO much for granted. The main message here is Mexico is not the US. You don't have the same anything down there. You are a guest in a country which has terrific people and great riding. If you go down there and forget this, if you go down there and act BIG ME and Little You to them you won't have a good trip. I get so tired of people saying this and that about Mexico. It is a great motorcycle trip. Yes we have wonderful things to see right here in the USA. But you can' get what Mexico has to offer here. Biggest problem I have found in Mexico is once is not enough. It keeps calling my name time and time again.
 

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JMHO but I wouldn't do it. They have strange mutually understood rules. Here is an example:

Our cruise boat had stopped in Progreso. I took a bus tour to Chichenitza. The bus was following a slower vehicle on a 2 lane highway. It seems that passing is OK if the dirt shoulder is wide enough for oncoming traffic to drive on. The gravel and dust flew. Surely a bike would have kept the ROW but who knows.
 

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Those that say don't bother don't understand "because it's there!" You know, why do people climb Mount Everest? Because it's there! There is no real scenery in Mexico just south of the border, but it is a different culture.

The year before last a buddy and I took a route through Mexico going to California from Lukeville, Az (Sonoida) to Yuma, Az (San Luis) about 120 miles but didn't spend the night in Mexico. We did get Mexican Insurance each from our insurance company (it cost like $10 if I remember correctly).

Like John at YVR mentioned above, we didn't even stop going into Mexico, rode right through the border. The road was very good, BUT ... it was raised about three feet above the desert with no shoulder it just dropped off straight to the desert. If we would have had to pull off, it was going to be an experience. We stopped at a little truck stop and they tried to charge us $24 US dollars for water, we laughed and started to leave, then they remembered it was a conversion problem and the cost went down to $2.95 for two bottles of carbonated water, it was all they had. There was no beer or alcohol for sale, it was a "dry" area.

Probably the biggest question was whether to drive the speed limit or not. Speed on these long deserted roads vary from 80kph (50mph) to 100kph (a little above 60mph). We drove for a while at the speed limit and was passed by everything, delivery trucks, scooters, other folks from places like California, Arizona and Montana. Finally, we said enough and drove at about 75mph most the rest the way with no problem. Not sure where a Policia would have a place to wait on that road anyway?

Along the way there are Federales check points. It is a bit unnerving the first time to have a kid, probably younger then my son, with a M1 Carbine watching you while they check your saddlebags. Don't take weapons into Mexico, I am not sure what they would have done had they found any, but they did a pretty thorough search. In the end no problem ...

Getting back into the US was a bit more of a challenge. The border crossing was backed up about a mile. So, we found a place to park close to the front of the line, out of the line. My buddy guarded the bikes while I went to find out what the holdup was at the crossing. They were searching every vehicle thoroughly and it took time.

I talked to a US crossing guard, his instructions to me after I told him we were on bikes were ... "I'm not telling you what to do, but I ride bikes and when we cross we will weave through traffic and pull up here at the crossing off to the side, then ask to have our bikes searched and go on through ... but I am not telling you what to do (wink, wink)!" This saved us probably two or three hours in line.

While I was away talking to border crossing guard, my buddy was watching the bikes. When I got back, he said he was never so glad to see me. Apparently, he was getting a lot of grief from a couple of Mexican guys who were obviously way beyond the point of being liquored up. They would have fallen over with a strong breeze, but they were trying to find out all they could in their inebreated state about riding motorcycles. Neither my buddy nor I speak any significant amount of Mexican and I am not sure what these two drunk guys spoke :) We left, we just got on the bikes and we were gone.

If you have never ridden in Mexico, I would do it just to say I did. Unless you plan to spend any time there though, there will not be much to see. Normal precautions when traveling out of country, avoid the big border towns, act like a visitor but don't be conspicous, you'll do alright.

My two cents.

regards,
 
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