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I have Freds vidio on serviceing Traxxion AK 20 equipped forks. He serviced the left fork. Is there a part that fits the bottom of the right cartridge so it adapts to the different lower leg? Freds video didn't show one for the left.








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The older Ak20's had a "Top Hat" shaped steel insert that went under the left cartridge. It is put in the fork before the cartridge with the smaller diameter at the bottom and also used a longer bolt. The newer ones don't use the top hat as the bottom of the cartridge was redesigned to fit into the recess at the bottom of the fork. The right fork does not use any spacer or "top Hat"
 

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By the way, it is important to note that the oil lock in the right fork leg goes in the bottom of the lower fork leg BEFORE the fork slider goes in. If you take the shiney fork tube (or fork rod) in your hand and turn it upside down, you can fit the oil lock piece down into the bottom of the shiney fork tube, and you'll then understand how it is designed to fit. Then when the upper and lower fork legs are assembled, and the right cartridge is installed into the fork tube, the bottom of the right fork cartridge fits down into the open end of the oil lock cup.
 

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Another big clue to excess barreling of the fork lowers is how the bushing wears. If all the teflon wear is localized to only part of the bushing you need to look at the lower portion of the fork lower cylinder for excessive wear. If the fork tube is traveling true in the fork lower, the wear should be consistent about the bushing. This localized wear is common in fork lowers with 100k miles on them and minimal service. Fork lowers that are serviced at regular intervals (20k-30k miles) seem to last much longer. My lower left fork leg lasted about 120k miles, the right was replaced at about 180k miles. As the fork springs lose strength the amount of travel becomes less and less, this concentrates a majority of wear in a small 1 to 1 1/2 inch section of the fork lower cylinder. Combine that with nasty over contaminated used fork oil scrubbing away and the wear accelerates.
 

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Another big clue to excess barreling of the fork lowers is how the bushing wears. If all the teflon wear is localized to only part of the bushing you need to look at the lower portion of the fork lower cylinder for excessive wear. If the fork tube is traveling true in the fork lower, the wear should be consistent about the bushing. This localized wear is common in fork lowers with 100k miles on them and minimal service. Fork lowers that are serviced at regular intervals (20k-30k miles) seem to last much longer. My lower left fork leg lasted about 120k miles, the right was replaced at about 180k miles. As the fork springs lose strength the amount of travel becomes less and less, this concentrates a majority of wear in a small 1 to 1 1/2 inch section of the fork lower cylinder. Combine that with nasty over contaminated used fork oil scrubbing away and the wear accelerates.
I wonder how many zip through a "rebuild?" without even considering the lower tube. I'd bet quite a few.
 

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Another big clue to excess barreling of the fork lowers is how the bushing wears. If all the teflon wear is localized to only part of the bushing you need to look at the lower portion of the fork lower cylinder for excessive wear. If the fork tube is traveling true in the fork lower, the wear should be consistent about the bushing. This localized wear is common in fork lowers with 100k miles on them and minimal service. Fork lowers that are serviced at regular intervals (20k-30k miles) seem to last much longer. My lower left fork leg lasted about 120k miles, the right was replaced at about 180k miles. As the fork springs lose strength the amount of travel becomes less and less, this concentrates a majority of wear in a small 1 to 1 1/2 inch section of the fork lower cylinder. Combine that with nasty over contaminated used fork oil scrubbing away and the wear accelerates.
I have never fully figured that one out. For sure the lowers do wallow out, there will be a very visible ring of wear in the lower fork leg casting.

Mine was shot at 28K, however the bushings and all seemed fine. Mine was the left side, so one might assume it had to do with the anti dive device, intertia causing it to lock in short travel as the wheel bounced down the road. Fooling the anti dive that the brakes are applied.

I have asked various experts about this, so far no real or definite answer that satisfies my curiousity about it all .

All that I do know is that some lower fork legs are found to show this wear with very little milage. Long term mileage is quite understandable, but with low mileage it is hard to know the cause.

All I do know it that it does happen.
 
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