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First time post and need some help. Recently tore a disc in my back and need surgery. It is possible that i may never be able to ride on 2 wheels again. I have a 2018 GL1800, live in NJ and looking to trike it out. Can anyone that lives in this area recommend someone to do this? Message me or private message me. Thanks, Doug
 

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I would not give up on the back just yet. In August of 2014 I blew out my L4-L5 disk in my back. Mine was anterior and posterior. Doc said it was as bad as he had ever seen. Had the surgery and in less than 5 weeks I was back on my bike. The doc didn't like it much but it felt fine to me. I took a 1,500 mile road trip in Oct. and a left coast trip the following spring. Still have pain associated with back but it doesn't bother me as much when I am riding. Go figure:shrug:
 

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I have the Roadsmith trike (2010 wing)
The trike may not be as smooth as you would believe..... Mine bounces all over!
Maybe it's the way the builder did it wrong (I honestly don't know cause I have never ridden any other trike besides my own) BUT the last time I rode the 120 miles one way to my Fuc*ing builder just to ask if this roughness was correct, he took it out for a ride, and claimed it was right and then charged me $90.00 for his five minute ride.......

Never take your bike to New Hampshire to get it triked out...........He will over charge you!!!

Ronnie
 

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Test rides are free here. Some will come from many states aways just to have me take their Wing or trike for a test ride.

Like Captron stated ... trikes ride rough. In fact they are probably the roughest riding vehicles on the road. The reason is because they go down 3-tracks. Motorcycles go down 1 track, and cars go down 2 tracks, so with 3 tracks, GW trikes get to hit all the bumps. In addition, a trike is a kit added to a m/c that was never intended to be altered like that. Trikes also use lots of "common" parts intended for a different application. For smoothness get one with a long wheel base and with independent suspension.

Another option is a CanAm which is a reverse trike. They are built from the ground up to be a trike and have a completely different suspension system. Harley make a trike too.
 

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I have a RS trike I converted my bike to in 2016. Really about the only time I notice it rough is when I come up on bad patch jobs on roads and shallow holes. No matter how fast you go over these it can be rough. The front of trike shakes on bad spots but I attribute it to the 6* rake I have on it. Regardless of ride I wouldn’t go back to 2 wheels.
 

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If you do decide on a trike conversion, insist on IRS. Independent Rear Suspension. It makes all the difference in the world. A solid axle suspension will beat you to death. We have owned both IRS and solid axle. Also, a 4.5 degree rake will assist in steering control. To enhance your ride, a front end suspension upgrade may be worth the money down the road. Just search your area for trike dealers. My wife and I both have Motor Trike conversions and couldn't be happier. Best of luck.
 

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Let me ad that setting the inflation of the rear tires on a trike will make a difference in the ride. These, obviously, are car tires being used for a much different purpose. I've encountered trike riders that thought they needed to pressure up the rear tires to the maximum displayed on the sidewall, to 35 or maybe 40psi. On a trike, most rider's sweet spot is around 25psi, give or take.
 
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Nothing wrong with a trike, if you get one that was built right. Like was mentioned, one with I/S, long wheel base and a good rake on the front end, minimum of 4.5 degrees. I've rode a number of trikes that belong to my cohorts in the Gold Wing org I belong to. Most of them are rough riding and your passenger can be whipped around their seat until you get used to the trike. A trike handles nothing like a bike, you ride a bike and drive a trike, it takes far more upper body strength to operate a trike than it does a bike. The most comfortable trike I have rode was an Euro Wing conversion, it as smooth and the steering was easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for your info. It’s helpful. What worries me even more is that I am only 5’-6” and about 150#’s. A little vertically challenged but have been riding GW’s for years.
 

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Before you make a final decision, ride (drive) a trike....or trikes. At Wing Ding my wife and I tried two of them and we were quite disappointed with how they rode and handle.

Very rough ride, bounced all over the road, I felt I had no control of it...especially in the curves. I'm seeing people riding them all the time so I guess you get used to it. But I can tell you with certainty I will not be one of them one day, thanks to the demo ride.

Again, you might like it a lot. We are all different....and that's why I'm suggesting you to ride them first.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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Before you make a final decision, ride (drive) a trike....or trikes. At Wing Ding my wife and I tried two of them and we were quite disappointed with how they rode and handle.

Very rough ride, bounced all over the road, I felt I had no control of it...especially in the curves. I'm seeing people riding them all the time so I guess you get used to it. But I can tell you with certainty I will not be one of them one day, thanks to the demo ride.

Again, you might like it a lot. We are all different....and that's why I'm suggesting you to ride them first.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

The first thing I noticed riding my trike was the new motion not experienced on two wheels. Since there are two wheels in back, there is side-to-side vertical motion over road irregularities that is not present on two wheels.
The second thing is that since it does not lean like a two wheeler, you feel a lot more inertia pulling you to the outside in turns and arm effort is required to hold a line in a curve.
However, my CSC trike, with IRS, has much better rear suspension than my stock wing had, so my wife likes it a lot better.
It took my wife and I a couple of rides to adjust, but we are happy. The trike extended our riding life a few years.
As others have noted, rear tire pressure is very important, about 25psi gives us a nice ride.
 
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