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I'm in Washington state heading for Vancouver and thinking of going home through Canada to Watertown NY.
Has anyone done a similar ride like I'm thinking of and was it something you would do again? Thanks
 

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Wow what a long ride. First the gas is a lot more money over $5.00 a gallon.

There was a movie on HBO about a year ago of a guy that rode that he was upset with his girl friend. It looked like a bunch of nothing. Maybe you can skip in and out of the 2 countries.

Good luck keep us informed.


.
 

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Travelling through BC is great. I would agree with the Hwy 3 recommendation. Once you get past Calgary going east, though, the prairies (Eastern Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) are pretty flat and the roads pretty straight. Not much to see.

I live in Calgary. If I were driving to NY, I would probably go as far as Regina Saskatchewan (mostly because I could freeload on my inlaws for the night in Regina), and then head southeast through Estevan, Minot ND, Grand Forks, Minneapolis, yada. Or go south from Calgary through Lethbridge to Great Falls.

If I were driving from Vancouver (instead of starting at Calgary), I would consider driving through BC on Hwy 3, and then dropping south through Whitefish Montana. Montana scenery is quite impressive, especially around Glacier National Park. And specifically, the "Going to the Sun" road (over Logan's Pass, between Whitefish and St. Mary's) is spectacular...although it's not fast, open only in the summer, and does have a lot of tourist traffic on it. The Calgary - Whitefish - St. Mary's - Calgary loop is a popular weekend ride from Calgary. Nice to see if you have the time to check it out though.

Anyway, once into the US, I would head east across the northern part of the US and south of the Great Lakes.

Of course, if you arrived in Vancouver with that route, then maybe going across Canada is a good alternative for something different.

If you do choose to stay in Canada, the TransCanada highway is a good road. It is two lane divided highway all the way from Banff to Regina, and I believe most of the way to Winnipeg. I haven't taken the TransCanada through Northern Ontario for years, but as I remember it the scenery was good and the road enjoyable, but it was definitely mostly not twinned so we regularly had to slow for RVs etc, and the gas was expensive....until you get over towards Sudbury Ont. Southern Ontario is much more populated and pleasant to drive through. Or you might drop down into Michigan from Sault Ste Marie.
 

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Excellent advice Gordon! Nice to see ya on the board! :thumbup: Warran.
 

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I've ridden across using this route once. Biggest difference is the price of fuel, food, and motels. The beaver buck is either even with the US dollar or as it has been the last couple of months worth more. I had more fun ridding US 2 from Everett to New York. Not a super slab hiway but a great ride.
 

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I have sold two wings to Canadians. One family said they couldn't get over the roads here. After taking a ride to Winipeg I understood why. The roads were awful at that time. But that was 5 yrs ago.

If I were riding cross country from Vancover, I'd drop into the usa and ride across the northern states. BUT Canada is a beautiful country.
 

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Coming from a transplanted Canadian(now living in Dallas/Ft. Worth) I would have to agree with some of the earlier posts. I have travelled from east to west and vice versa across Canada and it it a beautiful, scenic country. The ride across the prairies (while it is good road) is flat and straight and will probably bore you to tears. If you like to see wheat, then you will see plenty of that. Regina to Winnipeg is one very long flat road.
Anything east or west of that section will make for some great riding. It should be a great trip and I know you'll meet some great people....but then I'm probably a little biased.
 

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The ride through BC would be great. Across Alberta, Saskatchewan and part of Manitoba can be like riding across Montana, very flat and strait roads. I would suggest going northeast from Calgary to Saskatoon and down the Yellowhead route to Winnipeg as a more interesting route across these provinces. Once you get east of Winnipeg the road (Transcanada Highway) is very curvy and interesting. I have only been as far east as Thunderbay but I understand the route over the top of the Great Lakes is a great ride. Be forewarned gas, beer, cigarettes and hotels all cost more up here. Also don't try and bring hand guns or bear spray/mace across the border. I think you would have a great time up here, where else can you have the chance to experience a different culture while riding you Wing (an if you get to Quebec you will experience a totally different one)
 

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Northern Ontario is a beautiful ride too! If you get a good day the ride down along Lake Superior is breath taking. Nice part is.... you ride directly beside the lake for quite sometime too. Like all the others have said most things are a bit more expensive up here. Most important... NO Weapons!! Just sayin'
 

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Couple of us just did a partial reverse ride of that plan in July. We rode from Florida, Wing Ding (Knoxville) New York State Adirondacks and entered Canada near Massena, NY/Cornwall, Ontario. We wandered through the lower Quebec province, coming back to The TransCanada (11) near Matheson, Ont, and back into the States at Grand Portege, MN. Mileage from Cornwall to Grand Portege was about 1050 miles. Temperature in Geraldson, Ontario the morning we were there was 39 degrees. They mine Amethyst near Thunder Bay so if you want everyone to be happy, the significant other might appreciate a momento from your trip. The road was a bit rough in spots. I have some permanent bike scars and had to replace my front headlight protectors due to damge from stones and other things flying off the trucks but that was to be expected. Our gas cost was as high as $5.30 (computed) a gallon at a couple places. Stopped beside a moose that was feeding in the ditch near Hearst, Ontario and it didn't move so got some nice pictures. Our mileage was about 5,138 for the trip and only a little rain. One thing for sure, the Canadian breakfast was the best meal of the day.
 

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Pretty sure it is twinned all the way from Regina to Winnipeg now(used to be around 100 miles or so that wasn't). It is twinned to around 20 miles from the Ontario border and is single lane(one lane each way) for most of the rest of the way. They do have a quite a few passing lanes set up, but if you get stuck behind someone pulling a camper trailer or RV it can be quite a while in some places before you can find a place to get by.

The speed limit in Ontario is 90KM/H(around 55MPH) . Watch for the OPP at the end of the previously mentioned passing lanes. Some realy nice riding from the Ontario border to Ottawa. Lots of small towns that you go through so it does take time. The trans Canada is not like an Interstate Highway once you get to Ontario.


Travelling through BC is great. I would agree with the Hwy 3 recommendation. Once you get past Calgary going east, though, the prairies (Eastern Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) are pretty flat and the roads pretty straight. Not much to see.

I live in Calgary. If I were driving to NY, I would probably go as far as Regina Saskatchewan (mostly because I could freeload on my inlaws for the night in Regina), and then head southeast through Estevan, Minot ND, Grand Forks, Minneapolis, yada. Or go south from Calgary through Lethbridge to Great Falls.

If I were driving from Vancouver (instead of starting at Calgary), I would consider driving through BC on Hwy 3, and then dropping south through Whitefish Montana. Montana scenery is quite impressive, especially around Glacier National Park. And specifically, the "Going to the Sun" road (over Logan's Pass, between Whitefish and St. Mary's) is spectacular...although it's not fast, open only in the summer, and does have a lot of tourist traffic on it. The Calgary - Whitefish - St. Mary's - Calgary loop is a popular weekend ride from Calgary. Nice to see if you have the time to check it out though.

Anyway, once into the US, I would head east across the northern part of the US and south of the Great Lakes.

Of course, if you arrived in Vancouver with that route, then maybe going across Canada is a good alternative for something different.

If you do choose to stay in Canada, the TransCanada highway is a good road. It is two lane divided highway all the way from Banff to Regina, and I believe most of the way to Winnipeg. I haven't taken the TransCanada through Northern Ontario for years, but as I remember it the scenery was good and the road enjoyable, but it was definitely mostly not twinned so we regularly had to slow for RVs etc, and the gas was expensive....until you get over towards Sudbury Ont. Southern Ontario is much more populated and pleasant to drive through. Or you might drop down into Michigan from Sault Ste Marie.
 

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I'm in Washington state heading for Vancouver and thinking of going home through Canada to Watertown NY.
Has anyone done a similar ride like I'm thinking of and was it something you would do again? Thanks
Make sure you take Canadian money. I tried to buy soda's at a convenient store and they would not take US money. Had to charge. Charing is a good way to go since the card will do the exchange rate automnatically.
 

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Took the Trans Canada route years ago and would not do it again as it is one long boring ride once you get East of Calgary. The cost of gas is about 1.50 per gallon more, not to mention the cost of almost everything esle being higher.

I just did a circle tour of Lake Huron a month ago and enjoyed the Canadian side very much but everything cost more. It it was me I would stick to the American side why pay more to cover the same basic terrain?

Fred
 

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Tch

No doubt many people have rode this route.
I am speaking from experience after having rode each of these routes many times.
B.C. is spectacular. If you choose to ride up the Fraser Canyon on the TCH (Trans Canada Highway) or west on Hwy #3 (Crows Nest Hwy) you will not be disappointed. Different roadways, different views.
OR you can ride the TCH to Hope B.C. continue easterly on Hwy #3. Then cross back onto the TCH by travelling up the Okanagan Valley (Hwy #97).
Obviously each of these roadways take different routes across the Rockies. Hwy #3 is more southerly. The TCH offers the opportunity to see Banff, Ab. or travel the Icefields Parkway.
Once you are onto the Prairie Provinces or Prairie States the views are basically identical. Different roadways, same topography. Mans decision of where to locate the borders has no bearing what so ever on the scenery.
As of today the U.S. Dollar is basically trading at par with the Canadian Dollar. So that does not have any bearing on costs. If you choose to ride in Canada, the currency is in Canadian Dollars. As in every Country, the acceptance of any Foreign currency is at the discretion of the retailer. The fuel costs are about 20% higher, in B.C. yet near par in Ab. I can not comment on the costs of hotels, as I spend my travelling $ on fuel.
Obviously the TCH is in excellent condition. As is Hwy #3 or U.S. highway #20.
Do not let those that have not travelled both routes influence your decision. As they lack proper comparative knowledge.
Northern Ontario, is spectacular, as is the routing through Minnisota and Wisconsin.
Either choice you make will be enjoyable.
 

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No doubt many people have rode this route.
I am speaking from experience after having rode each of these routes many times.
B.C. is spectacular. If you choose to ride up the Fraser Canyon on the TCH (Trans Canada Highway) or west on Hwy #3 (Crows Nest Hwy) you will not be disappointed. Different roadways, different views.
OR you can ride the TCH to Hope B.C. continue easterly on Hwy #3. Then cross back onto the TCH by travelling up the Okanagan Valley (Hwy #97).
Obviously each of these roadways take different routes across the Rockies. Hwy #3 is more southerly. The TCH offers the opportunity to see Banff, Ab. or travel the Icefields Parkway.
Once you are onto the Prairie Provinces or Prairie States the views are basically identical. Different roadways, same topography. Mans decision of where to locate the borders has no bearing what so ever on the scenery.
As of today the U.S. Dollar is basically trading at par with the Canadian Dollar. So that does not have any bearing on costs. If you choose to ride in Canada, the currency is in Canadian Dollars. As in every Country, the acceptance of any Foreign currency is at the discretion of the retailer. The fuel costs are about 20% higher, in B.C. yet near par in Ab. I can not comment on the costs of hotels, as I spend my travelling $ on fuel.
Obviously the TCH is in excellent condition. As is Hwy #3 or U.S. highway #20.
Do not let those that have not travelled both routes influence your decision. As they lack proper comparative knowledge.
Northern Ontario, is spectacular, as is the routing through Minnisota and Wisconsin.
Either choice you make will be enjoyable.

:agree: We are leaving for a 3 week ride from Calgary, down through Radium Hot Springs, through the Kootenays, up to Kelowna, Vancouver, and finally across the ferry to Victoria (Sidney, actually). I have made this trip atleast 20 times over the years, and it is sooooooooo beautiful! It never gets boring and the scenery is spectacular! With the Rocky Mountains beside you, it is breathtaking! It should be a great ride! :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the input everyone,Canada it will be.
 

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I went to Calgary once... i won't go back.. from now on..i'll stay in the US and spend my money where US citizens are liked..

cosmic
 

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I went to Calgary once... i won't go back.. from now on..i'll stay in the US and spend my money where US citizens are liked.. cosmic
What?? :shrug: That's wierd? You couldn't find a friendlier city if you wanted to!! You are the first person I have ever heard that didn't like Calgary! Everyone loves this city and the surrounding Rockies!! Especially at stampede time! Sorry your experience wasn't a good one! How did you end up in Calgary from Louisiana, anyways?
 
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