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Just in the planning stages but one of the questions comes up about a break down. How do you plan for that break down when a long way from any where.

Will cell phone work all the way? Are there patrols on the highway? Carrier pigeons?

Any help will be welcome. Thanks
 

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Goldwings don't breakdown...

...but, if you are riding another brand of motorcycle, you should carry tire plugs, a set of basic tools and a credit card. Phone coverage is somewhat spotty, but available within a reasonable distance. People generally stop and help others although on some stretches, you might wait a while for another vehicle to come along.

When we go, we prepare by having a fresh alternator,(less than 50k miles), tires, brakes and battery installed.

The rest is an adventure. The risk is part of the trip. Mitigate it and go.

If you are one who worries, you might watch for other bikes or vehicles traveling your way and ask if you can ride along with them. You may make some great friends in the process. If it doesn't work out they have a compatible style, look again.

You are in for a treat! Have a great trip!

:thumbup:W
 

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Spot It

I went last June and went by myself. I carried a Spot 3 and set the custom messages up with a code the wife and another bike riding friend knew. Of course you have the SOS button if you hit a moose! If you carry one, keep it on your person in case you get launched.

I also signed up for Honda Roadside assistance. It was the only roadside assistance I could find that will tow you to a Honda dealer no matter the distance. Think I paid $70.00 for 2 years coverage. With that coverage and the Spot, I was not too concerned about lack of cell coverage. And you will be out of cell coverage A LOT!

Had lots of people who wanted to chat during the trip the further I got north. When filling up with gas, truckers would be very helpful with road conditions and where to stop and eat.

Good Luck! The planning is fun and the trip is outstanding!
 

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Alaska

On our first tip to Alaska in 2012, just 3 of us went, myself, me son BGBLK06 and a friend of our. We each took a gallon of gas. a one person tent, and sleeping bag. Rode to the Artic Circle, and road over 10,500 miles in 28 days. Great trip. Our last trip In 2014 the same 3 guys along with our wives. This time we pulled 3 trailers. We had a lot of room and a better knowledge of where we were going. Beside a gallon gas each we also took an extra battery, alternator, one front tire on a rim, a rear tire on a rim, a set of front bearings, extra bearings for each set of trailer wheels, tools, and some thing I already forgot. We each bought the Honda Roadside Ins. 5 years for $100.00, they will tow you to he closes Honda dealer. This trip also 28 days 11,000 miles. The women had great trip, and we also had a great second trip to Alaska. Good luck. Be safe and enjoy he ride. Larry
 

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Just in the planning stages but one of the questions comes up about a break down. How do you plan for that break down when a long way from any where.

Will cell phone work all the way? Are there patrols on the highway? Carrier pigeons?

Any help will be welcome. Thanks
As an Alaskan who has been traveling back and forth between my home state and points all across the U.S. for 55 years, let me say that I am far more concerned with traveling on interstate highways than the remote highways and byways of northern Canada and Alaska. On the interstates, if you break down and are sitting on the side of the highway, you'll need to watch out that you don't get run over. Up north, nearly everyone (other than tourists from the South 48 ) will stop to see if you need help, and they will help if you require it. The conditions under which I travel the Alcan on a motorcycle are often worse than you will ever experience, yet I don't hesitate because I am confident that if I am in trouble help will be forthcoming.

Over the years I have witnessed people preparing for a trip to Alaska, adding so many spare parts that they create problems by overloading their vehicles with more spare parts than they will have time to install. And, Murphy being in charge all too often, the parts they actually need are the very ones they do not have with them. If I know I will be taking a long trip on one of my bikes, I will install new bulbs, change oil & filter, make sure my tires have sufficient tread for the trip, or to get me to where I have pre-arranged to have new tires waiting. Then I hit the road.

Cell coverage is pretty spotty the farther north you go, and in the Yukon is only available near cities. Some highways in Alaska have good coverage, while on others it's just near towns and cities. There are no routine patrols, just other travelers who can either help, or carry a plea for help to the next town. But locals are usually well prepared to assist in just about any situation. Here, in my little community, we have an ambulance, 3 or 4 well-trained EMTs, mechanics, welders, lodging, etc. And yet, driving through the area you would hardly realize there is even a community. In the rural areas, we have learned to take care of ourselves and can handle just about any emergency. People will seemingly come out of the woodwork to help.
 

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IronMan
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:roll::roll::roll::bow::bow::thumbup:STILL GONNA TRY N DO THIS YEAR .:yes:
 

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How many miles are on your bike ?
The answer to that question may determine how much preventative maintenance you'll need before the trip.

Kurt
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Mileage

I have about 117k miles on my bike and will be riding 2 up pulling a trailer. Is there something special I need to do to the bike before going?
Tires will be new, on bike and on trailer, alternator just rebuilt, have Honda Insurance for towing, and from what is said above I will carry a good
supply of replacement bubs. I will carry few tools but do not have a list of spare parts I might need?
I have a piggy back trailer with torque suspension that didn't come with shocks. Do I need to fabricate and install some mounts for shocks?
Also what about a swivel hitch? I have read lots on both sides about the swivel hitch but don't have a lot of experience or knowledge either way.
 

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Just for peace of mind, my list would include brakes, battery, all switches lubed and serviced, front wheel bearings and fork seals and bushings checked. If you have room and want to haul it, I carry a spare front tire and wheel and a trailer spare mounted on the tongue of the trailer. (Just having it assures you will never need it!). if your A and B starter relays have never been changed, you may be due for either a change or carry a spare (which would work for either)

My tool kit includes enough tools for either wheel change, fork removal, and all body panels.

As for the trailer, if you have pulled it over 500 miles and it works for you here, don't sweat it...(IMHO)

Cell phone and a credit card and you're good to go!

:thumbup:
 
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