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How do you think the Honda Nav system compares to the after markt unit like the Garmin 2620

  • Buy the Honda Nav System (which means you like it)

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  • Buy a "Complete" GPS system like the Garmin 2620 or comparable model

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Discussion Starter #1
:cry: I have a Garmin 2620 that I have been using in in my car and that I also used for 47,000 miles on my Kawasaki Voyager over the past 2 years. The 2620 is so far superior to the Honda Nav system that I am actually sorry that I ordered it.

First, when you plan the trip in a logical manner, specifically from start point to end point, the waypoints actually do go in backward . In addition there is no auto sort function of waypoints like there is on the 2620.

Second, sometimes the system overlays your waypoints with what it has decided is the shortest or fastest route so you end up with loops combining both sets of waypoints.

Third, YOU CAN"T SAVE A ROUTE. It is absolutely absurb that you can't save a route (or segments of a route) on a bike that was built to go cross country.

That means that if you are planning a 10 day trip and you want to select specific roads (like we all do) you have to either enter the whole trip before you start or just that day's portion each morning. DUMB DUMB DUMB.

A real advantage when you enter a route in segments on the 2620 is that you can always see the estimated time of arrival for that day.

With this system, if you put in the whole 10 day trip you will see the ETA as a zillion hours and because of this fact it does nothing to help you plan where it is you may actually want to call it a day.

Fourth, the Honda Nav forces you have to bring the bike to a complete stop even to do the simplist tasks such as marking your current location. I understand the safety issues but a button for marking your current location and a button for finding the closest fuel stop or lodging should not require you to have to bring your bike to a complete stop to accomplish.

Pressing a button just makes more sense and IT IS MUCH SAFER THAN HAVING TO PULL OFF ON THE SHOULDER OF A HIGHWAY TO DO THESE BASIC TASKS.

Fifth, even to do these basic tasks, the Nav system doesn't allow you to enter zip codes, and there is no option for finding services or anything "ON YOUR CURRENT ROUTE", only NEAREST or by name.

Who cares if a service or Point of Interest (POI) is NEARER if you have to get off your current route to get there. The POI can be a tenth of a mile closer but off route and even in the wrong direction. DUMB DUMB DUMB!

I just returned from a 2,800 mile trip from NJ to Canada, across to MIchigan, south and back into Canada and then into NY via Niagara Falls, south to HWY 6 in PA and then back home. All I can say is that I found the system so totally frustrating that I wanted to rip the damn system right out of the bike.

I do plan on writing a letter to Honda and tell them just how poorly the Nav sytem is when compared to my 2620. I feel like I paid premium dollars only to end up with a "builders special" edition of the Garmin GPS system.

In my opinion, Don't buy the Honda Nav System - save your money and buy a Garmin 2620 or comparable model. They cost about $600 and the device that hooks the GPS voice into the audio system also hooks up your cell phone and even your radar unit if that is what you want.

IF ANYONE THINKS I AM WRONG ABOUT ANYTHING I HAVE WRITTEN ABOUT THE HONDA NAV SYSTEM, PLEASE POST A REPLY SO THAT MY LETTER TO HONDA CAN BE AS ACCURATE AS POSSIBLE..
Until then, Ride Safe,
DonNJ :cry:
 

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I have the Delorme Street Atlas USA on my Notebook and it simply blows away any minature garmin or any other overpriced handheld GPS device. It cost $100 plus the laptop.

The NAV system on the Wing is simple to use and convienient. It is not a full featured system and has never been advertised to be. It does get me from point A to point B and I find the accuracy of the roads on the maps to be outstanding.

The routing function is OK, and once you get used to adding via's beginning near the finish of your route, it is quick and easy to use. The route will stay in memory until you near your destination, for days at a time if needed. No, you can not save a route on the NAV system but it will stay in memory and you do not need to re-load the route after shutting off the bike. What I find most uncomfortable is that smaller cities names are not clearly displayed and you need to mouse over the little dot to see the name of the towns. For me, that is the biggest disappointment of the Honda system.

Myself, I am pleased with the Wings GPS system and find it easy to use and it dosent look like something rigged on the bike with wires all over the place. I just use my mapping program at home on my Laptop to plan the details of the route of my trip and then use the NAV system to simply guide me there... We also have a GPS system in our HUMMER and the Honda system is similar to that.

Bottom line - it's much better than a paper map and it will get you from point A to point B. Some people just want or are used to more than that from a GPS system. I am glad I bought it with our bike!
 

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I have called Honda, wrote two letters and filled out a survey they sent me, all to no avail. I do not expect them to address any of the issues with the NAVI system. To do so, Honda would have to admit that they have problems and they are not about to do that. They may come out with a chargable upgrade, that way they can fix the problems but call them improvements.
 

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Well...

I have the 06 with Nav. I also have the Garmin 2820.

95% of the time or greater the Nav system on the Wing is sufficient. There are times that I do like to sit down at the PC and plan a complicated route. I wish that I could download that on the Wing's Nav system, but I can't. That is where I enjoy having the 2820.

I also like the phone connectivity, MP3, Satellite Radio, XM Weather, XM Traffic and other features of the full blown GPS. What I don't like is having to disconnect it at each stop in order to keep it from being stolen.

The Nav system is a very basic GPS by today's standards. It is however very accurate and capable of getting you where you want to go. I love the big bright clear display. I like having the 2820, but don't mind the OEM being there. Having seen OEM GPS systems on other cage systems, I wasn't expecting much though.
 

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I like the NAV. I did my research before I bought it so I knew what I was getting. For my purposes it works just fine. For people who require all the bells and whistles, it's probaby not a good choice. I like the integration as opposed to a bunch of clutter on the handlebars. I like the big screen.

I filled out the survey too and I suggested getting rid of the "Unverified Road" messages and also getting rid of the need to get past that warning screen every time you start the bike.
 

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Re: Well...

Alton said:
...It is however very accurate and capable of getting you where you want to go. I....
"Accuracy" is a function of the map database and not the GPS!
 

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I have the factory Nav system and a Garmin 478.
The factory system is fine for most activities. It is an "automotive" system (by that I mean that it works like the ones I have used in automobiles). If you like automotive systems, you will like the factory Nav. If you don't, you won't like it.
I like the Nav system and I use it most of the time. I use the 478 for "on the fly" changes, mph, and, most importantly for me, XM and Nexrad weather.

I would never want an "add-on" Nav system that didn't have XM or Nexrad, but many (perhaps most) don't care about those features in a GPS. I'm not going to belittle a person or a manufacturer just because they don't build their models to my desires. I'll just purchase what works best for me.

Everyone has to research and get what's right for them.

Andy
 

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Andy Pearson said:
...I'm not going to belittle a person or a manufacturer just because they don't build their models to my desires....
I think that the real problem is that if you want ABS, you HAVE to also purchase the Nav system. Therein lies the travesty of the Nav system.
 

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Neil-In-Seattle said:
[quote="Andy Pearson":pwcthtq9]...I'm not going to belittle a person or a manufacturer just because they don't build their models to my desires....
I think that the real problem is that if you want ABS, you HAVE to also purchase the Nav system. Therein lies the travesty of the Nav system.[/quote:pwcthtq9]

Plus Bang for the buck.
 
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SpaGuru said:
I have the Delorme Street Atlas USA on my Notebook and it simply blows away any minature garmin or any other overpriced handheld GPS device. It cost $100 plus the laptop.

So basically, you are saying that the Delorme Street Atlas will cost in the end about as much as a GPS. I don't see the advantage here. Carry a laptop computer, which takes up space in the bike, or mount an aftermarket GPS on the bike. Plus, the Laptop is not interactive while on the move, so you have to stop to work with it.

Sure don't sound like a good system for me, but to each his own.
 
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DonNJ,

Thanks for posting this information. I was leaning towards the full up Wing with the Navi and Airbag, but the Navi sure does not sound like something I would want. I can even foresee me getting frustrated with the onboard GPS. I like things to work and work well. No limitations such as stopping for inputs. That is the most rediculous thing I have heard.

So now, I guess I will go with the basic Goldwing. I sure hope they change the options in '07, but I don't think they will.
 

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ammeaux said:
SpaGuru said:
I have the Delorme Street Atlas USA on my Notebook and it simply blows away any minature garmin or any other overpriced handheld GPS device. It cost $100 plus the laptop.

So basically, you are saying that the Delorme Street Atlas will cost in the end about as much as a GPS. I don't see the advantage here. Carry a laptop computer, which takes up space in the bike, or mount an aftermarket GPS on the bike. Plus, the Laptop is not interactive while on the move, so you have to stop to work with it.

Sure don't sound like a good system for me, but to each his own.
I have a Garmin 18 USB system on a laptop and use it in the truck. It is way better than a dashmount or handheld gps systems. The Delorme system and the Microsoft system for laptops are pretty much the same thing. Now granted laptops don't fit well on a motorcycle. However, in a truck, car, etc. they work great. The screen is much better/bigger than a dashmount or handheld gps, the laptop system is indeed interactive when you are moving, have voice prompts, routes, waypoints, POI, etc etc. They also run on a cheap ass laptop. The Garamin 18 system works on Windows 98 is just fine. Total cost is 300-500 bucks assuming your laptop is an older system. The dashmount GPS systems are 500-2000 bucks or there abouts. Anyone looking at a handheld GPS and driving at the same time is gonna have driving issues. The handheld screen is just too small. Also note, the dashmount GPS systems are also getting stolen out of vehicles left and right. Go ask your local police. Laptop system is easy to move to trunk or hide elsewere.

The GPS Nav on the GL1800 is based off of the Garmin 18 system that I have. Without looking at a manual or instructions from a salesman, I was withing 5 minutes able to run the Honda Nav system just fine.

I think it would help a bunch of you guys if you quite trying to work the Honda Nav system with multiple waypoints as routes. It does not think that way. It can use waypoints but it simply preferes to use an endpoint destinations. Search for a destination you want to go to, choose go to it and bam! The system tells you how to get there. Miss a turn or make a wrong turn, it will reroute you. hell, all ya have do is listen to the voice prompts. Don't even have to look at the screen.

Now be honest, how many computer jockies that can run the high end GPS systems are gonna buy a GL1800 with NAV. Your right, only a few. Honda has dumbed the GPS down a bit to make it very easy to use. Honda has to sell to the masses, not a small market. Bottom line is, if the Honda NAV system works as well as my Garmin 18 system, most people with love it and be very happy. And again, quite trying to run this thing with a bunch of waypoints as routes. Thats how the old handheld units were setup. This new stuff does not work that way. It's more like a digital camera, point it, shoot it, get great results. Most people don't want things too complicated. They want quick easy results and from what I have seen so far, the Honda NAV delivers.
 

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Honda Navigation System

I hate to say this, because I am a big fan of Honda products in general. But I find the GPS on my 06 to be lacking, especially when compared with the Garmin unit that I had on my 05 BMW 1200LT. I like being able to program the route that I wanted to take and then being able to save the route. I also like being able to find out my actual speed. It was just very useful. I didn't use all of its capabilities but I really liked it. On the plus side for the Honda unit, I like the size of the screen and the visibility in day or night. Using the Honda GPS has been pretty easy to learn. If I had to rate them from 1-10, I would give the Garmin a strong 8.5 and the Honda a 6.5.
Joe
 

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Here's the problem in my opinion...

We didn't have built in nav systems on bikes so we all had to look elsewhere. Garmin appeared as the clear winners and so we all got used to having map source on our PC's and being able to plan routes easily etc. Garmin also had to build the units to be portable and so put many features on them to support this (and the PC connection)... such as storable routes etc.

Honda, wanting to build sat nav into the Goldwing went to Garmin as the worlds No1 supplier of systems. However, they weren't looking for a portable system, they were looking for, and specified a built in automotive system.

That's not to say Honda did the right thing, but if you compare the Goldwings system to other built in automotive systems, it's not that bad and has generally the same features. It only starts to look bad when you compare it to the portable units with PC integration that you've grown to know and love.

Built in automotive nav systems are designed, rightly or wrongly, to get you from A to B, one step at a time possibly via some points of interest on the way. When you get to B, it becomes A and you start again. The Honda unit does this very well in my opinion.

Can you criticise Honda for not introducing new features such as route storage with their nav system? I guess so, and I know the benefits of it. You don't though have a leg to stand on if you go after them and accuse them of supplying a sub standard system. You know the unit was supplied by Garmin, and so it appears you're comparing it to stand alone Garmin units whereas you should be comparing it to other built in automotive systems.

I'm sure Honda will be open to suggestions for improvement of the system but you can't criticise the current system for being exactly what it was designed to be.

Regards,
 

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ammeaux said:
No limitations such as stopping for inputs. That is the most rediculous thing I have heard.
My Jaguar cars' system works in exactly the same way! Although at least it leaves some functions available when moving.

Please don't anyone take this comment the wrong way. I have many real friends in the US, I visit very often and do absolutely love your country, but it is because of your litigous, sue first, ask questions later mentality that we have to put up with this nonsense. Manufacturers, including Honda, do whatever possible to protect themselves from being sued by the stupid!

Most of us given free access to the controls would act responsibly but there will always be someone who doesn't. I've argued this until I'm blue in the face with Jaguar... and it's now the same story with the Honda. I can switch absolutely anything else on the bike. Hell I have a LH bar switch pod with what? 12 switches on it? So how can they justify locking out just the nav system (and pre-load adjustment)?

Honda however have taken this obstruction to a new level... and this is my only gripe with the built in system. If you forget to switch to the nav screen and accept the disclaimer screen before you start moving, you even have to stop again to do that. Now that is stupid.

Regards,
 

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ddh156 said:
I have called Honda, wrote two letters and filled out a survey they sent me, all to no avail. I do not expect them to address any of the issues with the NAVI system. To do so, Honda would have to admit that they have problems and they are not about to do that.
I don't get it. Is yours broken or something? What issues does yours have that need to be fixed? This is the way the system was designed to work. It is not a full featured system like the aftermarket units and is not intended to be. There isn't anything for Honda to admit to. A lot of people are quite content with the NAV system.
 

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ammeaux said:
SpaGuru said:
I have the Delorme Street Atlas USA on my Notebook and it simply blows away any minature garmin or any other overpriced handheld GPS device. It cost $100 plus the laptop.

So basically, you are saying that the Delorme Street Atlas will cost in the end about as much as a GPS. I don't see the advantage here. Carry a laptop computer, which takes up space in the bike, or mount an aftermarket GPS on the bike. Plus, the Laptop is not interactive while on the move, so you have to stop to work with it.

Sure don't sound like a good system for me, but to each his own.
The advantage is that the Laptop can have a huge screen instead of a digital camera sized screen, more detail, audible navigation, upcomming turns, route planning and printing, the ability to store anything, add notes to the map, add streets to the maps, endless breadcrumb trails, traveled route replay and saving, internet connectivity, and yes, it is very interactive while on the fly - it has 101+ keys on the keyboard which are called "keyboard shortcuts" - zoom, sat status, pan, add waypoints, detours, etc...

It is much easier while driving to simply glance over at the larger screen and navigate than looking at such a small screen with only a few identified roads on it.

No, the Laptop is not the best choice for a motorcycle though, but in my opinion, the Honda Nav system works just fine for the motorcycle.

I can carry the Laptop in the trunk easily, and have it logging my route at the same time, while taking up little cargo space, for more detailed information if need be.

The advantage of a laptop system over a handheld GPS? - Screen size, raw data capability, map editing, storage and memory is more, more buttons to utilize for on the fly navigation, remote antenna operation - not built into the laptop but connected with a usb cable so it can be placed convienently anywhere in ragne of laptop., not to mention all the other programs the laptop can run - at the same time...

Besides, I never said it was the best choice for a motorcycle, just a much beter system for less money than a handheld mini screen model...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for your feedback, but . . .

I understand what many of you have written about the Honda Nav System being equal to a standard automotive GPS and many of you think that I shouldn't compare a built-in system with a 2+ year old portable. Why not - I would expect the built-in system to be equal or better than a portable add-on.

And why would you want to compare the NAV system to that of any automobile. We all know that unlike a car, the trip is often (if not always) more important than the destination.

The GoldWing is advertised as the epitome of touring bikes and it is partly my fault because I couldn't imagine the Honda Nav system not being at least as good as a 2+ year old Garmin portable unit. But then again, neither did my Honda dealer!

I understand their concern for safety, but as one of you wrote, we already have gads of switches and knobs. As annoying as it is that the Honda Nav system forces you to come to a complete stop to do anything, I would not have been as critical if that were the only drawback. It is the lack of capability and the fact that it is so inferior to my Garmin 2620 that makes me feel ripped off.

You can not rationalize not being able to save routes. It is DUMB DUMB DUMB - plan and simple. Like I said in my additional posting, if you plan a 2 or 3 week trip, being able to save each days ride as a separate route BEFORE you get on the bike would not only make trip planning easier, it would also be the safest way to use the system. Honda should have asked Garmin for a feature that already exists.

How can anyone explain the fact that you cannot find any point of interest (POI) on the current route? Where is the logic of that?

Anyone can plan a trip by car across the US - get on I-80 and head west, but how many of us motorcyclists want to follow that route.

Ride Safe, DonNJ
 

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Re: Thanks for your feedback, but . . .

DonNJ said:
I understand what many of you have written about the Honda Nav System being equal to a standard automotive GPS and many of you think that I shouldn't compare a built-in system with a 2+ year old portable. Why not - I would expect the built-in system to be equal or better than a portable add-on.
So are you going to take on all auto manufacturers with built in systems or just Honda and the Goldwing? It seems to me that it is your level of expectation that's flawed and your purchase investigation, not the nav unit itself. If you feel your dealer misled you, then your gripe is with them not Honda. Honda simply supplied a nav system that you bought.

Please don't misunderstand this, I agree with you that more features to match or exceed a portable unit would be great. But that's a desire, not a fault with the current unit.

Regards,
 
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