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If I had only heard this from one person, I would have written it off as so much B.S.

However, in conversation with a number of riding friends from both Canada and the U.S.A. (not just Goldwingers either), they have said that, in general, the pavement on highways (particularly Interstates) in the U.S.A. is much more abrasive (i.e harder on tires) than in Canada.

Since Goldwings have a reputation as 'tire eaters' at the best of times, is this something that will make tire wear worse if we plan lengthy trips in the U.S:?::?::?:

Opinions :?::?::?:
 

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If your going to worry about tread life, stay home, if your looking for long boring roads, or straight roads your tires will cup, life is to short to worry about getting 20,000 miles out of a set of tire's. Go and enjoy your trip, check your pressure daily.
 

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If I had only heard this from one person, I would have written it off as so much B.S.

However, in conversation with a number of riding friends from both Canada and the U.S.A. (not just Goldwingers either), they have said that, in general, the pavement on highways (particularly Interstates) in the U.S.A. is much more abrasive (i.e harder on tires) than in Canada.

Since Goldwings have a reputation as 'tire eaters' at the best of times, is this something that will make tire wear worse if we plan lengthy trips in the U.S:?::?::?:

Opinions :?::?::?:
Luuuuke, the Darkside is caaaalling :call:
 

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In some countries they think are roads are paved in gold. But I would agree our infrastructure is declining.
 

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The Inerstate highways are typically corse pavement. They do not have a smooth finish.
The black top roads are much smoother by comparison. The tires grip both quite well.
 

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To answer your question, yes. Don't sweat tire wear Grandpa, just ride :doorag:
 

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Depends on where you are in the country as well. I found that MT and ID are much rougher pavement than the New England states.
 

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I have run Metzler tires almost always on my and my wifes 1800s. Get about 15,000 up to 18,000 miles per set. This past summer we rode to Alaska and back. Both bikes had new tires shortly before we left. Both bikes one up. I towed a trailer and my wife didn't. I replaced my rear tire at Grand Forks North Dakota because it was worn out. Probably had about 9,000 miles on it. My wife's tire lasted about another 1,000 miles and it was worn out. We rode from Wisconsin to Idaho, to Fairbanks and back to Wisconsin. Trip totaled about 8,600 miles. Many have said Alaska rodes are hard on tires. All I know is that our tires sure wore out quickly.
We sure had fun.
 

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... if you think the pavement is abrasive in the U.S.A. then just wait till you meet some of our people ... ;)
 

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If your going to worry about tread life, stay home, if your looking for long boring roads, or straight roads your tires will cup, life is to short to worry about getting 20,000 miles out of a set of tire's. Go and enjoy your trip, check your pressure daily.
Kinda like " lifes to short to drink cheap beer!":thumbup:
 

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I get about 3500 to 4500 miles on a rear tire on my FZ1 and maybe 8k out of the front tire... Compare that to my wing tire mileage which doubles to tripples that the wing is a bargan to ride... Just ride, Lifes to short to sweat the small stuff :coffee1:
 
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Road surface courseness varies by state. In MN the interstate is concrete with the standard broom finish. Blacktop is smooth until they add wear coat but that is small smooth aggregate.

Now Wyoming, Idaho and Washington use blacktop with a very jagged wear coat material, like shale or crushed razor blades.
I've heard it's harder on tires but can't say for sure.
All I know is I wouldn't want to be sliding down much of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
10-4

Road surface courseness varies by state. In MN the interstate is concrete with the standard broom finish. Blacktop is smooth until they add wear coat but that is small smooth aggregate.

Now Wyoming, Idaho and Washington use blacktop with a very jagged wear coat material, like shale or crushed razor blades.
I've heard it's harder on tires but can't say for sure.
All I know is I wouldn't want to be sliding down much of it.
That's more or less what I have heard.........and the same about a number of other states as well. Most of the Provinces in Canada use blacktop asphalt and/or brushed concrete.
 

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Down here in Southeast Texas, they are starting to use this new surface type called "Chip Seal." The additional tire wear doesn't bother me as much as having to wear earplugs while riding in a cage due to the excessive decibels it creates! This stuff sucks!
 

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If I had only heard this from one person, I would have written it off as so much B.S.

However, in conversation with a number of riding friends from both Canada and the U.S.A. (not just Goldwingers either), they have said that, in general, the pavement on highways (particularly Interstates) in the U.S.A. is much more abrasive (i.e harder on tires) than in Canada.

Since Goldwings have a reputation as 'tire eaters' at the best of times, is this something that will make tire wear worse if we plan lengthy trips in the U.S:?::?::?:

Opinions :?::?::?:
I do a fair amount of riding in Canada and the tires wear out there just like in the US, at least my part of the US (northern plains). Perhaps the worst tire wear I've ever experienced was on the Alaska Highway, which is probably 90% in Canada.
 
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I don't think it has much to do with the way the pavement is layed down or with procedures. The road surface varies due to the topping materials used which is just what is available in the region. Here we used fine washed rock which is round. In SD and many other states it's shale or gannet just because that is what is readily available in that area. Washed rock is much less aggressive than sharp edged gannet or shale.
It is what it is - Ride on.........:cool:
 
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