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Hope the first guy is ok.

For what it is worth when that happens just back off, let em go. Stay away from them. Give them the whole road and hit the brakes, let em go.

Might not help the oncoming but it will keep you clear.
 

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Hope the first guy is ok.

For what it is worth when that happens just back off, let em go. Stay away from them. Give them the whole road and hit the brakes, let em go.

Might not help the oncoming but it will keep you clear.
What are you trying to say? When WHAT happens? The guy in the car tries to pass on a double yellow...there's nothing to back off from or let go of. The guy in the cage was a total nimrod, passed when he wasn't allowed, hit the oncoming and then swerved into the rider he just passed. All in the blink of an eye.
 

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What are you trying to say? When WHAT happens? The guy in the car tries to pass on a double yellow...there's nothing to back off from or let go of. The guy in the cage was a total nimrod, passed when he wasn't allowed, hit the oncoming and then swerved into the rider he just passed. All in the blink of an eye.
Keep thinking that and die.

If some fool passes you on a mountain or curvey road, are you asleep? Do you not see what is developing. Or are you already dead? Some act like it.

Just back off, slow down, and do it quick, stay away from the car. Do not allow it to put you in a bad situation.

I do that many times if a car passes me for whatever reason, or in any place, I will let them go, put them ahead of me far enough I can react if need be.

It is called street smarts, and seeing what can happen, or might happen.

Then resume with a smile.

You did no see the unavoidable(I could argue that) first impact, then the second rider get cut off by the car. There are two you know. If the second rider had just backed off, he would not have been cut off.

It is all common sense, stay away from them. On a mountain road, give them the road. Let them have it. Then they will not swerve back into you.

Of course you have to be able to trust your fellow riders too, one more reason I now seldom ride in a group, I do not want to have to worry about how they will react.

Usually they are asleep too.
 

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I agree with giving the cars their space, You're absolutely right. I was just commenting on the rider that was cutoff not possibly having enough time. As soon as the car got out into the other lane to make his move, he turned into the rider on his right. Bad place to be at that time, but I just don't see how he could have avoided it.
 

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I agree with giving the cars their space, You're absolutely right. I was just commenting on the rider that was cutoff not possibly having enough time. As soon as the car got out into the other lane to make his move, he turned into the rider on his right. Bad place to be at that time, but I just don't see how he could have avoided it.
Yes sir, hit the brakes and hit them hard. Let the car go. Get away from it.

But like I said, you cannot trust those behind you either, they may be asleep and not react.

Group rides worry me. They always seem to be asleep.

I guess I just see things as they happen, before they happen actually, I see it setting up, before it happens. And just avoid it.

Now I did not avoid a deer one time.....nope, that one got me.

I hope the first rider is ok, the others are in shock centered on that is in front of them. I would have made a u turn and went back to see about him. The second one is moving ok, but that again is observation. I mean he sits up after scooting on his butt. I guess he is ok.
 

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If I were the guy behind the cage, it would have taken all I had not to head butt the driver with my helmet on.
 

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If I were the guy behind the cage, it would have taken all I had not to head butt the driver with my helmet on.
Around here we just shoot em. Lol!!

I think it is a great clip. Be perfect for an MSF class.

You have to watch them. I mean watch all the time. They will pass, and cut you off. Count on it.

They have somewhere to go, generally just a mile up the road.

Only a fool passes on a curve like that one, but there are plenty out there that will do it.
 

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Double yellow line crossing a$$hole...

Hope the rider came out OK


Matt(BCNV):cool:
 

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I really believe that one happened so fast that neither rider could have avoided what the moron in the Civic created. In fairness Kit, even the guy being passed could not have stopped quickly enough to avoid it. The car wasn't even completely around him when he got side-swiped. It's fortunate the the guy who had been behind the Civic from the start was able to stop in time.
 

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Yes sir, hit the brakes and hit them hard. Let the car go. Get away from it.

But like I said, you cannot trust those behind you either, they may be asleep and not react.

Group rides worry me. They always seem to be asleep.

I guess I just see things as they happen, before they happen actually, I see it setting up, before it happens. And just avoid it.

Now I did not avoid a deer one time.....nope, that one got me.

I hope the first rider is ok, the others are in shock centered on that is in front of them. I would have made a u turn and went back to see about him. The second one is moving ok, but that again is observation. I mean he sits up after scooting on his butt. I guess he is ok.
Trust me...some of the GW groups I used to ride with WERE asleep, and there was always the seniors on the trike in the middle who usually never even knew there WAS an incident...I stay away from groups these days....I can't say for sure and hope I never find out, but I think that as soon as that car pulled out to pass, either me or someone else, I would be doing some serious slowing down....or at least moving as far away as I could possibly get...
 

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I really believe that one happened so fast that neither rider could have avoided what the moron in the Civic created. In fairness Kit, even the guy being passed could not have stopped quickly enough to avoid it. The car wasn't even completely around him when he got side-swiped. It's fortunate the the guy who had been behind the Civic from the start was able to stop in time.
Ya all have it your way. I see it develop before it does. I would have been on the brakes the very instant the nose of the car came out.

I drive over 200 miles a day, in the heavy traffic, on rain soaked interstates, and I watch them like a hawk.

Today there were many accidents on the roads. It came a little rain and people were smacking into each other all over. I had at least two drunks ahead of me(good place for them I can see them) and one old lady just wandered all over the road .

Two guys on Harleys cut in front of the service truck and had all of two inches to spare, I braked and gave them 20 feet. On up they went, weaving and hot rodding and darting in and out. I just grinned, they will learn, if they live.

I just see things before they happen. It comes from being on the road all the time.

I have to say it helps on the bike. All you learn on the street you apply tenfold to a bike.

Like trell said , easy to armchair, but I have avoided the very same thing simply by emergency braking when need be. Both in the service truck and on the bike.

That emergency braking in the service truck is not good, all the fittings and parts and tools.........what a mess. It all tries to end up in the front of the storage areas.

You just learn to see it before it happens. As soon as the car starts to pass you react then, not when it is even with you. You know there very well could be a car, bike, whatever coming in the oncoming lane, so you figure on it, if not, no harm done, if you are right, you just avoided it.

Like I said, most are asleep. I cannot afford to be. I want to live and I want to have my truck for work. Really do not wish to have it torn up.

I have always had street smarts. I try to explain to people this and how to develop it, no one ever understands. They simply do not comprehend.

I can sense what you are about to do. I count on it. If you do not do it, cool. But next time I will expect it again.

Hard to explain. But over 1,688,000 miles in a service vehicle have taught me how to avoid. And I have never had a wreck. I had a little chevy citation some AT and T guy run into the back of the truck one time when I was in the store getting a candy bar. I do not count that one.

You just develop a sixth sense...........hard to explain.
 

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Post #12 is what Kit is talking about---as soon as that idiot started to pass, the bike rider(s) should have been on their brakes trying to open up as much distance between them and that idiot that they could! that would not have helped the oncoming biker, but might have helped the other biker. Of course it is easy to sit behind a keyboard and armchair quarterback-woulda, coulda, shoulda
 

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We never let a car in our line. When they squeeze in, the front bikes pull over and let them by. Was just in West Virginia. Had a car rideing our butt on twistys. First chance we got we pulled over and let him by.
 

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Kit is absolutely correct.
It's called situational awareness ..... and if you find that you can't read the road to where you have an idea of what to expect around a curve you've never been through before, can't anticipate what driver in the next lane is about to do before they do it, and aren't vigilant about looking for 'what if' paths of escape ........ especially when your spidy senses should be screaming at you in the type of situation the idiot in the car pulled off, then get off a bike until you can do these things in a cage, least your last ride is in a box powered by 6 buddies.
 

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This is a sad reminder of what happened a month ago to a friend of mine. He had a lot of miles on his Gl1800 and a lot of long trips with me. His wife died two months earlier and he went to visit his kids in Texas in his car. On the way back to Az he was heading to Roswell, NM and some guy in a truck was passing on a double yellow heading over a hill and hit him head on and instantly killed him two month to the day after his wife died. The State police said he had about 1.8 seconds to react after he saw the truck in his lane. He beat cancer and was back on his way to living again. The crazy thing is the guy that hit him was a safety inspector for some company in a rush for a late appointment. Live life to the fullest because you never know when it may happen to you.
 

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I'm agreeing with Kit about when being passed by cage. I'm also looking at this on my IPhone right now but did that bike pull out in front of the car? It seens you never see it and then all the sudden there it is.
 

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wow to me it mostly looks like an unfortunate case of some folks just happening to be in the wrong place, seems like the only one that could have changed things was the foolish car driver, please be extra careful out there everyone
 

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I also agree fully with Kit. There is nothing more important than constantly anticipating what can go wrong, and then adjusting your riding (speed, lane position, etc.) to stay out of harm's way. It may not have helped the unfortunate rider coming toward us, but it sure might have made a difference to the rider alongside the car.

I took a three day class/tour last year (and I'm repeating it this year with my wife aboard) from Stayin' Safe. This is exactly the kind of thing they teach. What attracted me to them in the first place, is their theory that something like 90-95% of motorcycle accidents are avoidable by the motorcyclist. I believe that. I believe that you can ride in a manner that keeps you out of harm's way most (not all) of the time if you maintain awareness of each potential hazard, and kn ow how to adjust to minimize or eliminate it.

I think that is the lesson of the video you just watched. If you didn't get it, all you saw was a careless cager hurt a few helpless riders.
 
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