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My rear Bridgestone tire got a puncture in it a few days ago and after pulling out the screw, I attempted to fix it with a sticky rope plug. That worked to get me home OK, but the tire is continuing to lose air. The tire still has a lot of good life remaining so I'd like to keep using it. In previous cases like this, I have had a patch put on the inside of the tire, which allowed me to use it until the end of its normal life. Now, however, neither the dealer nor the independant mechanic I use want to install a patch (liability, I guess) - and I don't have the tools to do it myself. Assuming there are no sharp objects protruding into the interior of the tire, my mechanic would feel OK about putting a tube in it, however. I don't see a reason to spend money on a new tire just yet, if this will be a good fix.

QUESTION: is there any reason it would not be good idea to put an inner tube in my tire to resolve the slow leak situation?
 

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Seems silly & possibly dangerous to put a tube in a tubeless tire to save $200 while riding a $20,000 motorcycle.
 

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I believe it will cause overheating and damage.
 

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I don't know why a motorcycle tire can't be patched. I drove semi's that hauled expensive loads and had the steering tires patched before. but I alays made sure they used a sticky rope to seal the hole from letting water, road salt and other contaminants from getting to the inner cords to cause deteriation. then cut the plug off flush on the inside and patch inside. And a semi tire gets much hotter than a motorcycle tire due to the excessive weight they haul
 

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On the front wheel of my 1976 BMW R75/6 I have a Metzler Lasertec TUBELESS tire mounted with a tube, and on the rear a Metzler Perfect ME 77 TUBELESS tire with a tube. The factory spoke rims in those days were pre-tubeless and require a tube. In fact, on the side-wall of the tire it says to use a tube when mounted on tube type rims.

So, why wouldn't a tube work in a tubeless tire on a GL1800?
 

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My rear Bridgestone tire got a puncture in it a few days ago and after pulling out the screw, I attempted to fix it with a sticky rope plug. That worked to get me home OK, but the tire is continuing to lose air. The tire still has a lot of good life remaining so I'd like to keep using it. In previous cases like this, I have had a patch put on the inside of the tire, which allowed me to use it until the end of its normal life. Now, however, neither the dealer nor the independant mechanic I use want to install a patch (liability, I guess) - and I don't have the tools to do it myself. Assuming there are no sharp objects protruding into the interior of the tire, my mechanic would feel OK about putting a tube in it, however. I don't see a reason to spend money on a new tire just yet, if this will be a good fix.

QUESTION: is there any reason it would not be good idea to put an inner tube in my tire to resolve the slow leak situation?
"Liability" is the correct answer. My mechanic was willing to do it -- once -- only because the tire had been purchased just the previous day (so, didn't even have the shine worn-off) and I was going out of town, and he cautioned me to not ride 'like I usually do' (i.e. like a bat out of hell in the twisties).

The next time, the owner and the mechanic -- on another tire -- said "replace it".

Never mind the fact that I've successfully avoided a very bad situation, since then, with a catastrophic tire failure due to road damage.

Better just to suck it up, and buy the new tire.

Ask yourself,

"Do I want to get seriously hurt (or stranded out in Absolutely Nowhere, ____ name of state/province___) for saving a couple of hundred dollars - if I can eliminate that as a problem source?"

my 0.02 YMMV

R.I.P., Bev. We never met, but one of the truest measures of a person is how they are loved by friends when they are having challenges, and after they've passed-along. You obviously had people who loved you, here, on the board.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, Ken. That's exactly the kind of information I was seeking. I understand now why it is unwise to use a tube in a tubeless radial tire. I guess I will either have to find someone who can put a patch on the inside of my tire . . . or buy a new one and have it installed!
 

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Thanks, Ken. That's exactly the kind of information I was seeking. I understand now why it is unwise to use a tube in a tubeless radial tire. I guess I will either have to find someone who can put a patch on the inside of my tire . . . or buy a new one and have it installed!
Put a BMT on it and forget about tossing a good tire forever.:thumbup:

Or find a shop that doesn't want to sell you a new tire,who will patch it!
 

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I had a new Avon Viper that picked up a staple. The rope patch held for only a few days. I tried all the bigger bike shops and none of them would patch a tire for liability reasons. I finally tried a small, local, independent biker type shop. They had no problem patching a tire for me. Unfortunately, the patch only lasted only about 3000 or so miles before it failed.

Joe in Modesto
 

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A good patch/plug will hold if it's installed right.
As far as I'm concerned, if the tire has to be removed for repair, might as well just replace it with a new one.
 

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I have a new Bridgestone G704 tire here at the house (for sale PM me). It has ribs on the inside surface of the tire. I think it would be difficult to get a patch to seal. I also think the flexing of the tube on these ribs might also cause a tube to fail.
 

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RideOn! Seal punture(if in the right place in the tire) and balance the tire!

Ride-On TPS will eliminate 85-95% of your flats in tubeless tires from objects up to 1/4" (1/8” for tube tires) that penetrate the contact area of your tire. Due to a tire’s inner curvature, Ride-On will not seal sidewall damage, or damage near the shoulder of the tire (the outside 1-1.5” of the tire tread). If a tire has a cut, impact break, bruise, bulge, snag, or sidewall damage, take the tire out of service and have it inspected by a professional tire care specialist.
 

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Greetings!

I'm working from memory here, but I seem to recall that some manufacturers were making special inner tubes with abrasion-resistant coatings for the purpose of using them in tubeless tires.

I think the main reason was so you could mount a tubeless tire on a spoked rim, but the literature also mentioned that they could be used as a temporary repair to a punctured tubeless tire.

Perhaps someone knows more about this? I am way too tired to search the internet right now.
 
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