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I'm getting ready for my 12,000 mile service and want to do it myself. I bought a MightyVac and then looked at Fred's video where he recommends doing the brakes without the vac because it is messy. I'm confused why it would work on the clutch but not on the brakes. If I have someone helping , wouldn't it be possible for one person to handle the fluid level while the other person does the vacuum pumping until the brakes have been bled and new fluid starts coming out? Any comments? Thanks in advance for your advice.
 

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I use a Mitivac to flush my brakes and clutch. I do it by myself. Having some help to keep the reservoir full ought to make the task easier. I'd guess the mess Fred refers to is having to stop and empty the brake fluid out of the Mitivac several times.
 

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BJMoose said:
I use a Mitivac to flush my brakes and clutch. I do it by myself. Having some help to keep the reservoir full ought to make the task easier. I'd guess the mess Fred refers to is having to stop and empty the brake fluid out of the Mitivac several times.
and hold the camera..... :lol:
 

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I also use the Mighty-vac and find with a helper to watch the reservoir and not let it run dry that this is the easiest and fastest and cleanest way to go, I would hate to go back to the old pump and bleed way of doing it.
 

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My problem with the Mityvac is its tendency to draw air around the bleed screws. It seems some of the bleed screws fit tighter that others, but I have found wrapping them with Teflon tape helps reduce the leakage. Filling the Mityvac reservoir once is enough to move fresh fluid through the lines.

On the other hand, reverse bleeding has some inherent advantages. Since the air bubbles naturally rise, pushing the fluid up from the bleed screws can sometimes remove air bubbles that resist traditional methods. Motion-Pro sells a reasonably priced reverse bleeder system.

Although I didn't believe it at first, I was amazed how well the "Overnight Compression Method" works. Just squeeze the lever (hand of foot), and tie it up over night. In the morning you will be surprised how much better the brake levers feel. I believe the air bubbles shrink while under compression. This effectively reduces the surface area and breaks the surface tension that holds the bubbles in the nooks and crannies of the system.

Good Luck,
 

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What works for one apparently doesn't for others, I tried the "tying the brake handle or pedal" overnight and it didn't do a thing for my bike nor help at all.
 

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Replacing the OE bleed valves with the check valve type is another slick alternative. Using a check valve in the plastic drain line is another option. Either of those methods allows one person to do the job easily with minimal mess. My OE bleeders allowed way too much air to be sucked past their valve threads to be successful with the Mity-Vac.

prs
 

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Pigeon Roost said:
Replacing the OE bleed valves with the check valve type is another slick alternative. Using a check valve in the plastic drain line is another option. Either of those methods allows one person to do the job easily with minimal mess. My OE bleeders allowed way too much air to be sucked past their valve threads to be successful with the Mity-Vac.

prs
I am kinda new to the brake bleeding. I understand the process and all but can you elaborate on the check valve. thanks a new one to me. how does it work, do you have a pic or a link I could look at?
 
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