GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In this month's Wing World, Stu Oltman has an article about the Uview Airlift 550000. This tool, with the use of an air compressor, will evacuate your cooling system after it is drained and refill it with fresh coolant in about very little time, without leaving air pockets.

I've searched the Internet and have found it for sale for around $100 delivered. The Airlift II, which is a slightly cheaper plastic version, costs about $12 less.

There is an Airlift Combo kit 590000 that includes a pressure tester that Uview has discontinued but is still available. However this kit requires an adapter to use it on the Goldwing and many cars with smaller radiator filler necks. This kit can be purchased from citusautomotive.com for $90 delivered. Mityvac has a universal adapter 4505 for about $35 that is also available from citrusautomotive.com. So for about $125 you get the Airlift and a pressure tester. Considering that pressure testers alone sell for over $100 some may consider this a best buy.

You can visit Uview's web site at uview.com.

I have no personal interest in any of these companies. I'm just sharing my research.
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Ellary, why bother with all that extra expence and hastle ? Just clean and fill your cooling system once and forget about it for years .
:D

THE BENEFITS OF EVANS NPG COOLANT FOR MOTORCYCLE ENGINES

TESTED AND PROVEN IN HIGH PERFFORMANCE RACING BIKES AND STREET MACHINES

CONTAINS NO SILICATES
PROTECTS FROM BOIL-OVERS
PERMITS INCREASED COMPRESSION WITHOUT DETONATION
ELIMINATES SCALE & CORROSION
PERMITS MORE SPARK WITHOUT DETONATION
COMPATIBLE WITH ALL METALS EVEN MAGNESIUM
LEGAL IN MAJOR RACING ORGANIZATIONS:
AMA (American Motorcyclist Association)
CCS (Championship Cup Series)

LIFETIME COOLANT
100% COOLANT - NO MIXING NEEDED
WILL NOT FREEZE
ESSENTIALLY NON-TOXIC
http://www.evanscooling.com/main27.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,099 Posts
Or, once every two years, you can drain and refill the cooling system with brand new coolant, with all new additives, and be off and running. Per the manual. No $100 tools, no exotic snake oil in the radiator, just the same old stuff that has run in wings for millions of miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
918 Posts
I bought the Airlift as the Airlift II is not only plastic, but doesn't include all the accessories. After reading the article and knowing it is hard to switch out coolant in the right mix without getting lots of air into the system can be a challenge.

Since I do my cars every four years and will probably go to extended life coolant for the Wing it will pay for itself quickly in time saved and reduced mess!

You can find the Airlift on amazon.com too. You can't buy it from their website and they weren't helpful at all at finding where to buy it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Do you need a compressor to operate this gizmo or does it come with some kind of pump?
I do my cars as well as the bike so I'll prolly get one.

Douglas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
Douglas said:
Do you need a compressor to operate this gizmo or does it come with some kind of pump?
I do my cars as well as the bike so I'll prolly get one.

Douglas
You need a compressor. BTW, this tool doesn't drain the cooling system - you do that by removing the drain plug. What the tool does is create a vacuum in the cooling system when it's empty. You then stick a refill hose into a jug of coolant and open the valve - the vacuum sucks in a gallon of coolant in about 15 seconds with no mess, no air pockets left in the water jackets, and no need to "burp" the cooling system (all over your bike and garage floor). Read the article.

dchance said:
Since I do my cars every four years and will probably go to extended life coolant for the Wing it will pay for itself quickly in time saved and reduced mess!
Exactly! I've already done all three of my bikes, my wife's car, and my pickup. BTW, the vacuum gauge on this thing will confirm the integrity of the hose connections and head gasket - no need for a pressure tester if the vacuum holds steady.

Stu
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,583 Posts
Stu,
I've read your article and was probably one of the very first ones to purchase this tool since this issue of Wing World was published. I got the one with the brass fitting for just a few dollars more.

Your article made sense to me, since after we've filled our cooling system and purged it, still some air pockets may remain in it, and if an air pocket is adjacent to a cylinder, a hot spot would develope causing detonation.

A well written article and very good advice.

Like I mentioned before, I wish you and Fred were my next door neighbors and Norm Abrams lived across the street. :lol:

Ride safely,

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,819 Posts
I read the article yesterday and as a former Aircraft Mechanic, any tool that involves valves, hoses and air compressors gets my blood going! :lol:

The only question I might have is.. is there any potential issues with applying a vacuum in a system that is meant to have internal pressure pushing out and not a vacuum sucking it in. Isn't it possible that the vacuum could collapse small cooling fins (if the wing radiator has any that is.. I havent looked yet)

I don't know.. that's why I'm asking. It just seems like a possibility to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
mattcaswell said:
I read the article yesterday and as a former Aircraft Mechanic, any tool that involves valves, hoses and air compressors gets my blood going! :lol:

The only question I might have is.. is there any potential issues with applying a vacuum in a system that is meant to have internal pressure pushing out and not a vacuum sucking it in. Isn't it possible that the vacuum could collapse small cooling fins (if the wing radiator has any that is.. I havent looked yet)

I don't know.. that's why I'm asking. It just seems like a possibility to me.
I was wondering along the same lines except I was thinking about the rubber hoses collapsing. It would stress the hoses more at the point where they overlap the rigid connectors.
I wonder how many pumps of a mity-vac it would take to evacuate the cooling system? :lol:
Ralph Wenzl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
rawen2 said:
mattcaswell said:
I read the article yesterday and as a former Aircraft Mechanic, any tool that involves valves, hoses and air compressors gets my blood going! :lol:

The only question I might have is.. is there any potential issues with applying a vacuum in a system that is meant to have internal pressure pushing out and not a vacuum sucking it in. Isn't it possible that the vacuum could collapse small cooling fins (if the wing radiator has any that is.. I havent looked yet)

I don't know.. that's why I'm asking. It just seems like a possibility to me.
I was wondering along the same lines except I was thinking about the rubber hoses collapsing. It would stress the hoses more at the point where they overlap the rigid connectors.
I wonder how many pumps of a mity-vac it would take to evacuate the cooling system? :lol:
Ralph Wenzl
I wondered the same things until I got with the manufacturer at the SEMA show this year. It turns out a lot of cars are vacuum-filled on the assembly line, and several manufacturers have made this tool mandatory equipment at dealerships.

Cooling fins won't collapse - no coolant goes through the fins. It goes through the small tubes that the fins are attached to. Sure, the hoses may collapse flat under vacuum. The ones on the GL1800 don't, but the ones on my wife's Miata went flat as a pancake. That doesn't put any stress on them to speak of - no more so than squeezing a hose with your hands, and certainly not as much as applying one of the hose pinch-off devices in common use. If a hose does rip under vacuum, you've just found a badly degraded hose that needed replacement. The only radiators that might experience problems are the older ones with brass top & bottom tanks, but only if the tanks are badly rotted. In that case, you just saved yourself from an on-road disaster. Don't worry, this tool is safe to use.

Remember the "Product Improvement Campaign?" Honda brought me into Torrance back then to have me spend a day with the model specialist going over the whole procedure - including measuring the coolant volume in the heads and bleeding the cooling system. After the engine was fully warmed up, the model guy spent an additional 20 minutes filling, burping, and refilling before he was satisfied with the result. This tool does a better job in 20 seconds without even starting the engine. That's progress in my book.

Stu
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
Re: Pricing

dcorby said:
I found the AirLift http://www.slaetechs.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=1987 here for $88.94. Pretty good price.
DO NOT BUY THAT TOOL!!! That's the first version of the tool. It was discontinued due to breakage of the stem connecting the vacuum gauge to the tool body. Some unreputable sources have found old stock that should have been returned to the manufacturer and are selling it on the net at "attractive prices." The current production tool is significantly beefed up in that area and protected with a thick rubber cone. It also comes with additional adapters.
Just a friendly warning.

Stu
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
I just purchased the brass Airlift from sjdiscounttools.com Price was $101.66 delivered. Arrived in two days and is the newer version as Stu described above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Stu_O said:
Douglas said:
Do you need a compressor to operate this gizmo or does it come with some kind of pump?
I do my cars as well as the bike so I'll prolly get one.

Douglas
You need a compressor. BTW, this tool doesn't drain the cooling system - you do that by removing the drain plug. What the tool does is create a vacuum in the cooling system when it's empty. You then stick a refill hose into a jug of coolant and open the valve - the vacuum sucks in a gallon of coolant in about 15 seconds with no mess, no air pockets left in the water jackets, and no need to "burp" the cooling system (all over your bike and garage floor). Read the article.

dchance said:
Since I do my cars every four years and will probably go to extended life coolant for the Wing it will pay for itself quickly in time saved and reduced mess!
Exactly! I've already done all three of my bikes, my wife's car, and my pickup. BTW, the vacuum gauge on this thing will confirm the integrity of the hose connections and head gasket - no need for a pressure tester if the vacuum holds steady.

Stu
Does the engine need to be at operating temperature when using the airlift to pull a vacuum so the thermostat will be open?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
918 Posts
I have not heard that anyone using the Airlift that they did it other than the engine being cold, which is an advantage.

You have to remember that even when a thermostat is cold there is still, by design, a small amout of fluid that can pass. There are reason for that, but I can't remember what they were.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Stu_O said:
BTW, the vacuum gauge on this thing will confirm the integrity of the hose connections and head gasket - no need for a pressure tester if the vacuum holds steady.

Stu
Not entirely true. Sometimes you get a leak that will leak only under pressure or vacuum, not both. This type of leak is rare though, so doing just the vacuum test would be a good quick check.

dchance said:
You have to remember that even when a thermostat is cold there is still, by design, a small amout of fluid that can pass. There are reason for that, but I can't remember what they were.
To let any air pockets get by. If an air pocket got trapped it can insulate the termostat enough to not let it open until the coolant temp is way too high.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
pckaufman said:
Stu, How can I tell if the tool I order is the New version or the Old one?
Funny you should ask. I just got off the phone with UView. They tell me the old units were dropped several years ago, so they doubt there are any still out there - maybe some sites are still using old pictures. As for the cheapie pricing, UView has found some of their customers whoring up the market - but there's a catch. Ask for the delivered price. You may find them charging so much for S&H that it would be cheaper to order elsewhere.

Stu
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
Stu,
I just got off the phone with Uview too. The Combo unit #590000 is the old style unit that Uview doesn't support anymore, EVEN THOUGH IT IS STILL SHOWN ON THEIR WEBSITE. It doesn't come with all the adapters, so I will have to find an adapter made by Stant to fit the Wing.

I purchased the #590000 form S&J discount tools for $73 + $13 shipping yesterday. Uview says it will work OK, but it is not warrantied by them and they have no parts for repair.

Len
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Try the Mityvac universal adapter #4505. It's about $35 plus shipping.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top