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I just completed my first coolant change with the UView Airlift 550000. Amazing tool! The UV550000 makes it so much easier to perform a good coolant change. In addition to refilling the system, I used it as some have suggested to help drain the system. After performing a standard drain procedure, I put the plug back in and pressurized the system. I then removed the pressure and opened the plug and got at least a half a quart more coolant out of the system. I probably could have done it a couple more times but just did it once. I then pressurized the system again and attached the refill tube. It refilled the system in about 30 seconds. No air! I then did a startup and let the system warm up and did a couple of throttle blips. I got may a few bubbles but not like usual. It worked very well in my opinion.

The other thing I did that helped was to use my MightyVac to drain the overflow reservoir. This was so much easier to do than removing it. Whoever it was on the board that came up with that idea is a genius. So much easier to do. I always dread taking the overflow reservoir out to drain it and clean it.

The one thing that I think needs improvement is the staging bucket for the coolant. I just put the pickup tube in the bucket and that worked fine. However, I ordered a 1/2" barbed tank fitting to mount in the bottom of a 5 quart graduated paint bucket.



I'm going to mount this in the bottom of the bucket and suspend it so that the pickup of coolant is always below the fluid level. This well help keep air out of the pickup tube and will also aid in "priming" the pickup tube with coolant. I think this will work better than just placing the pickup tube in a bucket.

This may be one of the best tools that I have bought....right behind the "speed bleeders".
 

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They are great, got mine & did the bike last fall & plan on using it to do my car sometime this fall. Makes it real nice not having to burp the air or have a bunch of antifreeze spill all over the place.
 

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Here is the reservoir that I made up to manage the coolant. This makes it easy to prime the pickup tube and keeps air from getting in the tube since it always draws from the bottom. You still need to make sure you have more coolant in the bucket than you will need in the bike.
 

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Great idea and write up!!!!
 

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First I've seen or heard of this, any more pictures or videos of it in use (I checked YouTube, but couldn't find anything useful)
 

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First I've seen or heard of this, any more pictures or videos of it in use (I checked YouTube, but couldn't find anything useful)
I don't have any but will take some the next time I do one. It's actually very easy to use. Here is a write up on how to use it.

How To....UView Airlift 550000

There are a number of threads here on the UView Airlift that you might do a search on as well.
 

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Perfect thanks, I'll be buying one of those.


Don't you just love forums, just when you think you've bought everything, something cool pops up to satisfy that urge.
 

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I just used mine again to change the coolant on my ST1100 and BMW F650GS. The Wing will be next in a few weeks. It simply works very slick. My friends in Bellingham and Olympia will testify to that.
 

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Reading through the article, I can't help be a little bit of a skeptic when he says he "removed all the air". It's not possible, unless you plan on inverting and tilting the bike in every conceivable direction to get the coolant to displace the air held in pockets. Vacuum alone cannot do this, but it sure helps with the installation of the new stuff. I'm thinking that the amount of vacuum they applied to the system is a little extreme :?: These things aren't engineered to have that much vacuum applied, they're made to hold pressure, and I'm visualizing the radiators being damaged, or worse, a seal or gasket suffering the vacuum.
Interesting concept, but that much vacuum has me concerned :22yikes:
Steve F
 

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Reading through the article, I can't help be a little bit of a skeptic when he says he "removed all the air". It's not possible, unless you plan on inverting and tilting the bike in every conceivable direction to get the coolant to displace the air held in pockets. Vacuum alone cannot do this, but it sure helps with the installation of the new stuff. I'm thinking that the amount of vacuum they applied to the system is a little extreme :?: These things aren't engineered to have that much vacuum applied, they're made to hold pressure, and I'm visualizing the radiators being damaged, or worse, a seal or gasket suffering the vacuum.
Interesting concept, but that much vacuum has me concerned :22yikes:
Steve F
Its only 25 Hg. It's not a lot of pressure. No one has mentioned having any issues at all with it. On the contrary, my buddy has an ST1100 and has had difficulty changing the coolant and periodically has temperature rises that are on the high side. After borrowing my UView, he has had no problems at all with temperature fluxuations. I think if some folks were having problems with them, we would have heard something.
 

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It plain works. I've used it on both my bikes and my truck multiple times. No damage and no significant air left behind to "burp". Very clean, easy, and efficient way to change the coolant.

I think you're way over thinking this and worrying about non-issues.

Reading through the article, I can't help be a little bit of a skeptic when he says he "removed all the air". It's not possible, unless you plan on inverting and tilting the bike in every conceivable direction to get the coolant to displace the air held in pockets. Vacuum alone cannot do this, but it sure helps with the installation of the new stuff. I'm thinking that the amount of vacuum they applied to the system is a little extreme :?: These things aren't engineered to have that much vacuum applied, they're made to hold pressure, and I'm visualizing the radiators being damaged, or worse, a seal or gasket suffering the vacuum.
Interesting concept, but that much vacuum has me concerned :22yikes:
Steve F
 
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