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Discussion Starter #1
Just finished doing a valve adjustment on my 05. Bike has 30,000 on it (I bought it a year-and-a-half ago with 8k on it) and was hoping no shimming would be necessary. No such luck - ten of twelve valves were on the tight side. Five intakes at .005, one at .004 and five of six exhaust at .008 or real tight .009. I checked all the shims with a micrometer and one of the exhaust shims was marked 2.02, but was actually .002 oversize, so replaced it with an actual 2.02 to bring that valve into spec. Needless to say, I miced all ten shims that I bought before I installed them. After reshimming, was pleased to find all valves on the plus side of the nominal, but no .007s or .010s would go. Just like I (almost) knew what I was doing. Should be good for a while. Fred's video, BTW only shows replacing shims on the left bank, so doesn't deal with the procedure for removing and replacing both cams. I needed my shop manual for that and the explanation in the manual is a bit murky. Luckily there is a diagram for us guys who ain't too smart. After removing and replacing the right cam, had a bit of problem getting the left cam back in. Cam chain would go over the cam sprocket but the cam wouldn't "lay down" back in the head. I rotated the engine 360 degrees and it went right in - not sure what the problem was, but maybe a kink in the chain that I couldn't see. Thanx, Fred for all your good instructions!

I used the tool I got from Pap on this board (I don't think he is making them anymore) for "winding-up" the tensioners on the cam chain. Thanx, Pap!

I've done this job twice before on the 03 I had and I followed Fred's video. This time I used a Pit Bull lift. What a difference! No more sitting or crawling around on the floor.

Waiting for the valve covers and plug covers to come back from chrome plating so that I can button her up and go riding!
 

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Congrats and thanks for posting. Now you got me thinking I better start measuring the shims...Grrr...just to save any necessary work.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I guess I got a good one.
My 2005 at 32000 miles were .006" intake and .009" exhaust.

later..Randy
I think mine was built on Monday morning - lots of little stuff to be corrected. For instance, most of the tapped holes in the frame were waay undersize.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just curious, what kind of money are you paying to have the parts chromed?
$225 for the four pieces - I used to do a fair amount of business with Valley Plating in Santa Clara (408.988.5502) so I may be getting a bit of a discount. Then again, maybe I'm paying a premium. :joke:
 

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Just finished doing a valve adjustment on my 05. Bike has 30,000 on it (I bought it a year-and-a-half ago with 8k on it) and was hoping no shimming would be necessary. No such luck - ten of twelve valves were on the tight side. Five intakes at .005, one at .004 and five of six exhaust at .008 or real tight .009. I checked all the shims with a micrometer and one of the exhaust shims was marked 2.02, but was actually .002 oversize, so replaced it with an actual 2.02 to bring that valve into spec. Needless to say, I miced all ten shims that I bought before I installed them. After reshimming, was pleased to find all valves on the plus side of the nominal, but no .007s or .010s would go. Just like I (almost) knew what I was doing. Should be good for a while. Fred's video, BTW only shows replacing shims on the left bank, so doesn't deal with the procedure for removing and replacing both cams. I needed my shop manual for that and the explanation in the manual is a bit murky. Luckily there is a diagram for us guys who ain't too smart. After removing and replacing the right cam, had a bit of problem getting the left cam back in. Cam chain would go over the cam sprocket but the cam wouldn't "lay down" back in the head. I rotated the engine 360 degrees and it went right in - not sure what the problem was, but maybe a kink in the chain that I couldn't see. Thanx, Fred for all your good instructions!

I used the tool I got from Pap on this board (I don't think he is making them anymore) for "winding-up" the tensioners on the cam chain. Thanx, Pap!

I've done this job twice before on the 03 I had and I followed Fred's video. This time I used a Pit Bull lift. What a difference! No more sitting or crawling around on the floor.

Waiting for the valve covers and plug covers to come back from chrome plating so that I can button her up and go riding!

Why is it that you can drive a car so long without having to worry about valve adjustments ?
Are bikes deliberately engineered so you have to do something major every few thousand miles ?
Buying a bike turns out to be the cheapest part of cycle ownership.....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks, how long do they guarantee the work?
I've never asked because there's never been a problem with their work for me. Give em a call - talk to Fred, the owner and a Honda guy. He doesn't even (mostly) hold it against me because I ride a Harley, too.:lol: They do NOT do wheels, however.
 

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Generally, there are exceptions, car engines don't turn the RPM's that bikes do. So cars get by with hydraulic valves. Notice many cruisers have hydraulics and don't require adjustments but once when they are assembled. At least that is the way it has been explained to me. I could be mistaken about that but no one has ever corrected me.........yet.
Gotta' get a set of those videos.
 

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Most autos have hydraulic valve lifters and adjust themselves as they wear, so to speak. The hydraulics limit how fast they can work which limits the max RPM before engine damage occurs. I think the main reason Honda chose to use a solid valve train was the extra weight and cost a hydraulic valve system would have added to the engine. I also think the valve covers would be larger and stuck out on each side even further than they are now if they were hydraulic.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Generally, there are exceptions, car engines don't turn the RPM's that bikes do. So cars get by with hydraulic valves. Notice many cruisers have hydraulics and don't require adjustments but once when they are assembled. At least that is the way it has been explained to me. I could be mistaken about that but no one has ever corrected me.........yet.
Gotta' get a set of those videos.
I'm talking out the side of my neck here, so....The GL1800 isn't really a high RPM engine. I've read that the shim-under-bucket is also a space-saving design, but I'm too ignorant about engine design to know if that's true or not.
 

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True, the engine is relatively low revving, and bucket shim designs are a bit more compact. another inch on each side of the engine for screw type adjusters would make considerable width difference.
 

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Why is it that you can drive a car so long without having to worry about valve adjustments ?
Are bikes deliberately engineered so you have to do something major every few thousand miles ?
Buying a bike turns out to be the cheapest part of cycle ownership.....
To add to what has already been said, honda tried hydraulic lifters on earlier wings and they were problematic.
 

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A year ago when I was at the dealership to buy a few new shims, I asked the parts guy why Honda didn't stick with hydraulic lifters like the 1500 or at least the nut and screw valve adjusters like the Valkyrie had, which was fairly easy to adjust. His comment, "Honda is now a performance driven company; buckets and shims are for more precise performance."

I don't know enough about performance design to know if he was delivering me a line of BS or not. But I do know the Wing is a spirited machine!
 
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