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I have 158,599 miles on my Gold Wing and I have never had the valves checked. When I went to the dealer he said I would just be wasting my money because they would still be in speck. What do you people say about that? Thank You.
 

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I had the same experience as Tan.

When my 2007 Wing racked up enough miles for its first recommended valve adjustment, the service manager said, 鈥淚 shouldn鈥檛 tell you this, but save your money. In all they years we鈥檝e been selling Gold Wings (family owned exclusively Honda dealership since 1977), we鈥檝e only seen 1 Wing that鈥檚 been out of spec.鈥

Tim
 

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My 03 with 102.000 on the clock has had the valves run three times. Once by the shop under a maintenance program I purchased when I bought the bike, then by myself on the last 2. They have been unchanged.
 

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I checked mine at 50,000 expecting them to be in spec, but 5 needed adjustment. A month ago at 90,000 miles I checked, again expecting all to be fine. The first 11 were fine, the very last one I checked was tight and out of lower range by. 001". I felt like saying good enough, but went ahead and ordered the 202 shim to replace the 208 and all are fine.
Hard to imagine the dealer would believe all would still be fine at 150,000 miles. I would highly doubt it.
 

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2002 Stream Silver ABS. Full Traxxion Suspension.
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I'm glad you posted this question. I'm only at 45K+ on my new to me 2002 but the owner's manual says it's passed the mileage for it's first valve clearance check, and since it's 20 years old I've been considering doing it. I've been wondering if I really even needed to check the valves, it doesn't look like that difficult of a job after watching Fred's videos.
 

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Not checking the valve clearances ever is a bad practice IF you keep your bike for the long term. If you are a frequenct trader, let any problems be some future owner's problems.... I suppose. The first check is most important as the new parts wear in. Honda quality control is very good, and "wear-in" of parts may be minimal with their products; but those of use who DO check our valves have found adjustments needed on occasion. My 2002 needed shim swaps on its first check and I made a small adjustment on the second check in the frivolous persuit of "center of speck" on another or two. No further adjustments were needed to be in spec up through 150,000 miles. It is a water cooled large, but relatively low powered, engine that just loafs through life and will tolerate neglect better than most; BUT maintenacne is far cheaper than repairs or new complete heads.

If you rely on a dealership to check, you are at their mercy. They may report all to be WNL. You might assume that means "Within Normal Limits" when it may mean "We Never Looked". There are GOOD RELIABLE dealerships and service shops, ask on this forum about your area to find one. If you have the skills and desire; it is not a difficult job, just time and somewhat tedious work; and can be quite enjoyable for some.

prs
 

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I've done literally hundreds of valve checks/adjustments on 2001-17 Wings. Typically I find the first adjustment is needed at around the 70K mile mark, but it depends some on how close the valves were set at the factory. Since shims only come in .025 mm increments, even the factory can't set all of them exactly in center.

Another thing to consider is what you call "out of spec". The manual gives you a +/- .025mm tolerance, or basically one thousandths of an inch. So if center spec is .009 on an exhaust valve, technically it isn't "out of spec" until it reaches .007 on the tight side. But if you do a valve check and find an exhaust valve is at .008 in and you don't change the shim on it, that means that in a few thousand miles it may reach the .007 mark, at which time it is now "out of spec".

So the wise thing to do is to set them all to center spec while you have it apart so that you don't have to worry about it again for a long time. If you do this around the 70K mile mark, you may not have to do it again until well into the 200K mile range.

Now you could ignore it and just ride it, but as your valves get tighter, you'll start to loose some gas mileage. I've seen several bikes that had exhaust valves at .005 inches, and I'd say if you start to approach .003 or .002 inches, you could be in danger of burning a valve. So I guess it depends on "how lucky you feel" (punk).
 

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On the new generation Wing (2018 - on) the new "uni-cam 4 valve head" employs roller rockers with screw adjusters on the exhaust valves and cam followers on the intake valves. This new head design means the valves will need to be checked more often, and typically I think you'll find the exhaust valves go out of spec much sooner than they did on the older generation Wing that used a shim under bucket design on both intake and exhaust.

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On the new generation Wing (2018 - on) the new "uni-cam 4 valve head" employs roller rockers with screw adjusters on the exhaust valves and cam followers on the intake valves. This new head design means the valves will need to be checked more often, and typically I think you'll find the exhaust valves go out of spec much sooner than they did on the older generation Wing that used a shim under bucket design on both intake and exhaust.

View attachment 401347
You got a ex-ray machine!
 

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GL1800 - 2008
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I'm glad you posted this question. I'm only at 45K+ on my new to me 2002 but the owner's manual says it's passed the mileage for it's first valve clearance check, and since it's 20 years old I've been considering doing it. I've been wondering if I really even needed to check the valves, it doesn't look like that difficult of a job after watching Fred's videos.
OK, I just did mine and will tell you if you have as ABS bike the right bank (1, 3, 5) will be a challenge, if you release the cam chain tension, and do the procedure as Honda specifies in the service manual. I took some photos and found a method of re-inserting the bolt in the cam chain de-tensioner that you might want to take a look at..... Valve clearance check - 2008 ABS

There is very little room to get the bolt out and is "a real treat" reinstalling it. If you are planning on doing it, buy the tool Honda sells to detention the chain...it will be a nightmare without it (if your bike is an ABS).

PM me if you want to talk more about process.
 

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2002 Stream Silver ABS. Full Traxxion Suspension.
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@Arch Wood Nice write up with the pictures on that other thread (y)
 

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When I did mine, I used a small straight screwdriver to loosen the cam tensioner and a pair of locking players to keep the tension.

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GL1800 - 2008
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When I did mine, I used a small straight screwdriver to loosen the cam tensioner and a pair of locking players to keep the tension.

Sent from my SM-N981U using Tapatalk
Could have done the same if my bike didn't have ABS. There was so little space to work...without the Honda tool (or something similar) I do believe the task would have been almost impossible.
 
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