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Everyone has good tool choices above, I run a 1/4 drive swivel ratchet on a 1/4” nut driver that has a female 1/4” on the handle and 1/4” male on the other end. This little setup has been used on everything, car-bike-truck-lawn mower-etc. 1/4 drive metric hex‘s with ball ends, 1/4” deep sockets, torx, the list goes on and on. Even with all of that, you sometimes will need to make something to do a special job. I picked up old 1/2” drive sockets From garage sales etc. to be stored for future use/needs. You can never have enough tools, so you will never be fully prepared. Just don’t let it keep you from starting the project.
 

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As stated above - patience, the right tools for the job, a manual (like Clymers) or even better Fred's DVD set, and beer for celebrating a completed job with no bolts nuts or screws left over.

Standard maintenance and adding accessories really isn't that bad. Kinda like jumping off a cliff into a cold lake. You just have to believe you can do it.
One really important thing to remember - if you get stumped you have a collective knowledge on this board that will be happy to help.
Several here have helped me without even knowing. If you search enough someone has had the same problem and someone here has offered solutions.
 

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As stated above - patience, the right tools for the job, a manual (like Clymers) or even better Fred's DVD set, and beer for celebrating a completed job with no bolts nuts or screws left over.

Standard maintenance and adding accessories really isn't that bad. Kinda like jumping off a cliff into a cold lake. You just have to believe you can do it.
One really important thing to remember - if you get stumped you have a collective knowledge on this board that will be happy to help.
Several here have helped me without even knowing. If you search enough someone has had the same problem and someone here has offered solutions.
Wait! You jump off cliffs into the water!!! Not this arthritic bag of bones. LOL.
 

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You can use this every year and never you don't have to remove any panels to do your oil and filter changes:

 

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Wait! You jump off cliffs into the water!!! Not this arthritic bag of bones. LOL.
Lol - no.
Maybe that was a bad analogy, but my point is don't be afraid to jump in and tackle the job, within your abilities of course.
 

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I use my rechargeable LED cordless light for almost every project regardless of which tools are involved. The light is almost always the first one (and sometimes the last) on the job.
Also the "special" garage reading glasses (aka "cheaters").
 

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I always had trouble getting the DCT filter to come down out of its hole in the bottom of the engine. Almost like it's held in by a vacuum. Medium size Needle Nose Pliers to the Rescue. Insert them into the hole in the bottom of the filter and pull out hard on the handles. Filter pops right out.
 

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You can use this every year and never you don't have to remove any panels to do your oil and filter changes:

Being the oil changeohlic that I am, this is the best tool ever......... I use it every oil /filter change (y)

Ronnie
 
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You can use this every year and never you don't have to remove any panels to do your oil and filter changes:

I've got that, and I like it.

One "pro tip": When using it for the first time, make sure the oil drain plug is only "snug". If it's been robo-torqued in, the soft aluminum of this wrench will bend quite easily. It can be hammered back into shape, but probably only once. The oil drain plug doesn't have to be seated with crazy torque, as there isn't any pressure on the back side of it, but apparently the previous owner didn't know that.
 
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Checkbook and/or credit card. Cash is better. I do not “enjoy” wrenching.
 

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I guess I am looking for anything that is helpful. I've ordered the OEM filter with the filter wrench included, I got a set of picks for pushing in the body clips and fishing out o-rings, planning on installing speed bleeders. Just rambling here and musing.

Let me know your thoughts.
The service manual for your model of bike.

The ability to read, understand and follow the methodology that Honda's technical writers are using to describe how things come apart and how they go together. Many people get very confused on this point.

Nearly all of the videos out there are "for entertainment value only." Take that for what it's worth.
 

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Here are some photographs of the tool kit I carry as well as a list of what you see in the pictures. I haven't ever actually needed it for my Goldwing . . . . but I have made a few friends over the years because I had it.
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Tool Set - 002.jpg

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Tool Set - 001.jpg

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Tool Kit List - 001.jpg
 

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As the title says, what are the most useful tools for working on your Goldwing. The reason I am asking is I am stock piling a bunch of accessories that I will install in the winter (pathfinder cowl and fog lights, tie downs, traxxion tie rod, etc) . I am trying to be prepared to make it as easy as possible on myself since I am NOT a natural born mechanic.

I guess I am looking for anything that is helpful. I've ordered the OEM filter with the filter wrench included, I got a set of picks for pushing in the body clips and fishing out o-rings, planning on installing speed bleeders. Just rambling here and musing.

Let me know your thoughts.
Got to have a head lamp!
 

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All great ideas!

One thing I have that, IMHO, is a great invention and a "must have." Some where, some time, planned or unplanned, you will need to remove a snap ring. Snap ring pliers rarely ever cooperate and result in excess frustration. I have one of these:
384820


Turn the handle to get the right tension, inside or outside, and can slide the snap ring on or off with two fingers. Easy, peasy. I only use it once in a while but damn happy to have it.
 

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a lot of good suggestions here. One item you should keep on the bike at all times. a small vice grip (I ride with two). A Goldwinger dropped his bike once on a ride I was on, and snapped the clutch lever off. Those vice grips clamped to what was left of his clutch lever got him home.
 
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