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I have a new rear diff assembly from a trike take off. The entire assembly including brakes. My bike has a pretty good driveline vibration at 90 MPH. It has always been there since new. I have compared it to other bikes and mine is defintly different. I was wondering how difficult it would be to swap these suckers out just for poops and grins.
 

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why not get it fixed under warrenty? To me that is the easiest way.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Have you got any idea what Mother Honda would say when I tell them I have a vibration at 90 mph?
 

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About the same thing they would say when you tell them you have a wobble at 40 with your hands off the bars.
 
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Toyo said:
I have a new rear diff assembly from a trike take off. The entire assembly including brakes. My bike has a pretty good driveline vibration at 90 MPH. It has always been there since new. I have compared it to other bikes and mine is defintly different. I was wondering how difficult it would be to swap these suckers out just for poops and grins.
90 MPH?????

:roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :crew: :crew:

Sorry I can't be of more help.
 

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Does it go away at a 100? Tim
 

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Symptom: 90 mph Low speed final drive vibration. :?
Solution:Increase your leisurely cruising speed and see if it goes away. :p
 

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I can see nobody has actually tackled this problem. :lol:
 

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It shouldn't be too hard. You have to remove the right saddlebag of course.

Unbolt the old one, disconnect the brake lines, pull it out and replace. You will have to get the drive shaft out of the old one and in the new one as well, but I believe it just pulls out. Reconnect the brake lines and bleed the system when you are all done.

I am getting ready to replace mine in a few weeks, and will probably take photos of the process when I do.
 

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I think you would be better off leaving the saddle bag on. Your high speed vibes could just as likely be the drive shaft or the drive shaft coupling where it enters the final drive. Maybe the trike builder has the take-off drive shaft for you too. Jack 'er up and put jack stands under both rear crash guards. Remove the wheel and tire, brake line bracket, caliper with brake line still attached -- support the caliper and brake line. There are four nuts on large studs that hold the final drive to the swing arm mating surface. Remove those (they are tedious and tough -- Locktite, but not too awfully difficult). The final drive and drive shaft will then be free to lower (a bit heavy - maybe 45# or so) and then you work on a bench. The rubber drive shaft boot is a suspect source of vibes. There is a part that keeps the drive shaft in the final drive input and I think it is supposed to be replaced every time its re-assembled. If you are a strong person, this jog is not too hard to do. I suspect the drive shaft is the most likely culprit. Do the swing arm inspection while you have it exposed -- another potential source of bad vibes (mine was binding on the bearing seals from poor initial install).

prs
 

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Just a hint. I forget exactly which bolt it is, but you can't get a wrench on it (one of the four) with a long enough lever to break it loose unless you're Hercules. I put a open end on it and slid a floor jack 'tween the bags where the rear fender was. Set the floor jack under the box end of the wrench and just jacked up the wrench to pop it loose.

Forget a torque wrench, just use open end to get 'em tight.

It's really not a hard install (on just the center stand) and it will not be necessary to remove any plastic except the rear fender piece as mentioned. I did it alone in about an hour which included putting my rotor on the new final drive (needs an impact driver tho).

I would be careful of using the disc that came with it for two reasons. One, the handling/shipping/etc of the whole unit may have warped the rotor even tho it is pretty darn sturdy. The pads will not match the groove already in the old rotor.
 

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90 degree gear box

You should be abel to do this with out removeing the break lines. Just remove the caliper and set it to the side or tie it up out of the way with a pice of coat hanger. Make sure you tie off the center stand so it does not roll foward. Remove the right hand sadel bag and take the old gear box of and slide the new one on. Cant really say if youll have trobel slideing the new gear box on as it needs to drift into the drive shaft. This may prove to be trobelsome. Dave
 

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Waldo; I recall getting a box wrench on the upper left side hex nut and then used a rubber mallet to rap the wrench handle to break the bond.

flydeep is correct; do not detatch the brake lines, just the bracket clamps, then hang caliper and lines way up in the fender well out of the way.

prs
 

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Toyo said:
I have a new rear diff assembly from a trike take off. The entire assembly including brakes. My bike has a pretty good driveline vibration at 90 MPH. It has always been there since new. I have compared it to other bikes and mine is defintly different. I was wondering how difficult it would be to swap these suckers out just for poops and grins.
Had mine off a while ago, long story for another time.

Taking off the right side muffler is required, was for me anyway. Otherwise fairly straightforward. One nut was tought cause just couldn't get a good swing on the wrench, no room for a ratchet either. Just took time.

There is a spline in there that I believe you need moly grease for. Molydisulphide I think is the right stuff, check the service manual.
 

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Pigeon Roost said:
Waldo; I recall getting a box wrench on the upper left side hex nut and then used a rubber mallet to rap the wrench handle to break the bond.
Yup, my fingernail is still black so I opted for the jack (after a few choice words!!!!) :evil: :x Not much room to hammer under there just on the center stand.

Great White is right, forgot to mention that the muffler had to come off, but that's easy too. Just a cover and a hose clamp more or less.
 

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I changed mine out because I had a free new rear end off of a trike conversion and I was wanting something to do that day.

It took about 2 hours but I probably could do it now in a hour or less.

Put bike on center stand, I had it on a lift table. Pull rear wheel, Remove four bolts holding rear end to swing arm, you can just reach around. Pull brakes off and out of the way, Remove Rear end, I also changed out the drive shaft just because I had a new one. Forgot, you gotta remove the muffler on the right side,

Prior to doing this, I had a vibration that started around 90 MPH and after doing the new end, I still have the same vibration..

Hope this helps

JMHO 8)
 

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Like Tom, I did this because I got a free one from my dealer. My 01 had 163K at the time. The one I replaced it with was from an 06, and I had to tap a hole on the o6 that holds the brake lines. Onthe later models, Honda moved the brake lines more on top of the rear end. On my 01, they got around the rear end forward. I just used the old brake caliper, never bled nothing. All of this pertains to a NO ABS swap. Most trike conversions are NO ABS. If you have abs, you will have to keep your speed ring from your bike.

Ed Jenkins, Pawnee, IL
07, 7,000 miles
 

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1. Remove rear wheel & fender
2. Loosen rotor bolts/screws
3. Remove right muffler
4. Loosen brake lines from clamp
5. Loosen and remove caliper from mount
6. Remove rotor. The drive is much lighter without it on
7. Remove 4 bolts from final drive and pull it out
8. Install in reverse. LOL...

Easily done on the centerstand. Just don't push the bike off of the stand. It's a good idea to secure the centerstand to the front crash bars.
 

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Red is right !! Secure the center stand to the front of the bike. Don't even ask me why I think this is a good idea !! :cry:
 

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KA7W said:
Secure the center stand to the front of the bike. Don't even ask me why I think this is a good idea !! :cry:
LOL... I dropped my, almost new, 1200 off of the centerstand over 20 years ago. I had both wheels off of it. :? I had a stinkin' mess. I was built like a brick outhouse back then. I still couldn't get it back up by myself. It was worse than a beached whale. Didn't hurt the bike, but my back was ate up for weeks after that fiasco! :oops:

I keep a spare ratchet tie down on my tool box just for that purpose. I hook it from the centerstand to the back of the engine guard. 8)
 
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