GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
Well I tried to start the bike a couple of days ago...battery is dead. I started it up a few times this winter with no problems...just didn't let it run long enough and the battery drained.

I have a car charger which I used on my GL1000, but now I can't remember the setting I should use. I have three choices 12/6, 12/2 and 6/6. Which one should I set it at to charge the bugger?

Thanks,
Ryan / Zigs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
use the 12/2
12 volt
2 amp
Should be fine. If it has automatic shut off when done just hook it up overnight, if not test it after a couple of hours.
It shouldn't boil or get warm to the touch. if it does shut it off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
One time this guy who worked at a used battery place in San Jose told me it's better to use the lower amperage setting and leave it on for a longer duration, allthough the higher amp setting will charge it faster.

Since the guy worked at a used battery store, I figured he knew what he was talking about.
 
I

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Go to Wally World or Sears and get a Schumacher Battery Maintainer. (about $20 at Walmart) It will charge a max of about 2 amps when the battery is low, and will then drop back to a "float" rate of about .5 amp. to hold a charge indefinitely. Since the battery is near dead, this will take a while but is the best way to do it.

Come time to store for the winter, just hook up the maintainer with the supplied quick connect cable, and walk away. Your battery will be fine come spring.

Starting your bike once in a while during storage is a bad idea. It creates condensation that dilutes your oil and corrodes your exhaust system because the engine doesn't run long enough to burn off the moisture.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,247 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
748 Posts
Well, you have a GL1000, so that implies you have a traditional battery, possibly, and not a sealed one.

If that is the case, I would consider removing it from the bike, first, especially if there is a possibility that it froze. Do a good visual inspection, looking for evidence that it froze. If anything is cracked, get rid of it. If it is not froze, that is good.

Next, I would make sure the water lever is correct, remove the caps, then try charging with the 12/2 setting. If the battery voltage was below 10v, 12/2 might not be enough, and you may have to kick up the charger to the next setting, but monitor the battery. If the water starts to gurgle and bubble, turn it down. Also, monitor the case, and make sure there is no swelling or leaks.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone for your replies.

Just to clarify, the issue is on my 1800. I have an older charger...doesnt have a shut off feature, just a switch for the three options. Ill try the 12/2 tomorrow when I get home from work. I dont think it will need much. Im just more concerned about charging with too much power all at once.

I would use a battery tender, but....the bike has been parked outside the last two winters, at an apartment...don't trust the elec cord...well that and I dont have a place to plug the cord into, lol. The battery actually holds a charge very very well; I just started it up a few times this winter without running it long enough to charge the thing back up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,459 Posts
Go to Wally World or Sears and get a Schumacher Battery Maintainer. (about $20 at Walmart) It will charge a max of about 2 amps when the battery is low, and will then drop back to a "float" rate of about .5 amp. to hold a charge indefinitely. Since the battery is near dead, this will take a while but is the best way to do it.

Come time to store for the winter, just hook up the maintainer with the supplied quick connect cable, and walk away. Your battery will be fine come spring.

Starting your bike once in a while during storage is a bad idea. It creates condensation that dilutes your oil and corrodes your exhaust system because the engine doesn't run long enough to burn off the moisture.

I agree with the above........

However, if a battery is completely dead (no voltage), a maintainer will not activate and charge the battery. The battery maintainer needs to recognize some voltage before they will start charging. In this case, you would need to use a 1 - 2 amp regular charger to built up some voltage in the battery then you could switch to the maintainer.


The problem with using a high amperage output charger is that it generates excessive heat in a small motorcycle battery. This can lead to warped plates and shorten the battery life. Or possibly short out the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Why take a chance with an old battery that may even have gotten frozen and/or broken connections internally. Batteries are cheap compared with being left stranded by the side of the road because the bike won't restart.

A great bike deserves a reliable battery

only my opinion, everybody paddles their own boat.

Safe riding
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
477 Posts
Thanks everyone for your replies.

Just to clarify, the issue is on my 1800. I have an older charger...doesnt have a shut off feature, just a switch for the three options. Ill try the 12/2 tomorrow when I get home from work. I dont think it will need much. Im just more concerned about charging with too much power all at once.

I would use a battery tender, but....the bike has been parked outside the last two winters, at an apartment...don't trust the elec cord...well that and I dont have a place to plug the cord into, lol. The battery actually holds a charge very very well; I just started it up a few times this winter without running it long enough to charge the thing back up.

Next winter, you should give some thought to storing the battery in your apartment and connecting it to a battery tender. No need to start the bike in the winter if not riding it.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top