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New-to-them Goldwing (5th gen) owner. This individual is related to me, so be nice!

If you were to give them counsel or advice on one single thing about a Goldwing (note, this isn't their first motorcycle, but their first touring motorcycle), what would it be?
1. Unless he is justified in trusting what the previous owner told him about past services performed, and unless the bike came with receipts of past service or parts purchased, go through it and change oil, filter, AF, rear lube, coolant, clutch & brake fluid, plugs, and more.
BONUS: Use only 2 fingers on the front brake in parking lots and on gravel, to avoid dropping it.
 

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1) Battery....the thing needs it's electrons...put some charging/maintaining pigtails on it...buy a good (brand) of charger/maintainer ( I like CTEK) AND use it....those big batteries aren't cheap and it's kinda big to push start it
hth
 

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My original query was for one, not five...but I'll give you three ;) I did tell him to this point:

~ No floorboards
~ No heel-toe-shifter lever
~ Consider getting rid of the crash-bar mounted highway pegs for something different - then I pointed at my bike at what I have in it's place.
When I became a Wing owner last spring I did (removed) the first two items on your short list soon after I got done riding it home. Also the "driver's" backrest and passenger armrests.
I wasn't going to mention it because it seems to start a whole other discussion of preferences, but I'm glad you were the one to tell them...
Coming from a couple Concours and the ST1300 that "cleansing" of accessories felt very good.
 

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New-to-them Goldwing (5th gen) owner. This individual is related to me, so be nice!

If you were to give them counsel or advice on one single thing about a Goldwing (note, this isn't their first motorcycle, but their first touring motorcycle), what would it be?

NOTE: This is motorcycle-specific things, not ancillary things like clubs, gear, etc.

...and, go!
Learn the functions of all the buttons and switches, and where they are located without having to take your eyes off the road. Especially if you own and ride two or more motorcycles.

This is akin to the old military training of field stripping a rifle and putting it back together blindfolded, so you could do it in the dark in a foxhole.

And YES, I AM showing my age!
  • :ROFLMAO:
 

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I would tell them to do the homework and don't go cheap when buying the riding gear...high end gear is more protective and offers more comfort and enjoyment when riding in not so nice weather...you get what you pay for and nothing more when buying motorcycle gear.
 

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My advice to a new 1800 owner? Simple...

Be prepared to put in multiple long days in the saddle before you even begin to think about shifting your butt for a more comfortable position.

- David
 

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The one thing that I wasn't prepared for was the amount of torque available from jump. The power surprised me more than once on my ride home from Texas when leaving parking lots. Grabbing a fist full of throttle at low speeds while turning onto a road can be exciting.

jdg
 

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Learn how to pick it up. Everything else is no different than what common sense tells you.

Unless trying to get info to fix something, stay the hell away from the internet. It will only confuse and freak them out. :D
 

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Everyone pretty much covered any advice I would have given.
1. Keep the forum's posts in perspective. If you latch on to too much, you will begin to wonder if the bike is a piece of junk. (It isn't) .
2. Don't buy every accessory you think you might want, or worse, all the accessories everybody else thinks you should get. Ride the bike. Get a feel for what you like, don't like, and what you feel is missing.
3. Practice in a parking lot. It's a heavy bike, but it has a low center of gravity. Once you get a feel for the lean with low speed practice, the bike will feel like half its weight.
4. Just go out and enjoy the bike. It's a great machine that will leave you with a lot of great memories.
 
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