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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I feel dumb asking this question.

I had a wheel bearing starting to fail so before I had a complete failure I changed the bearings. I used the clone of the Honda Factory tools that you can buy on EBAY to remove and install the new bearings. The new bearings (All Balls) felt smooth and nice like new bearings should before installing them in the wheel. After installing them all 4 felt a little rough. I thought maybe I damaged them, so removed them. After they were removed they felt great again. Measured the wheel and the bearings and everything looks great. I am nervous about installing them and having a problem since they feel rough once installed.

Will they break in if I use them? Do I have anything to worry about?

Thanks in advance for any wisdom that can be provided!
 

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Discussion Starter #3

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Do I have anything to worry about?

Thanks in advance for any wisdom that can be provided!
I would ... did you grease them ???
 

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There are some non OEM replacement items that are worthwhile buying, such as antifreeze, oil, brake fluid, and light bulbs. When it comes to other items, like wheel bearings, steering stem bearings, brake pads, and oil filters, IMHO the price difference is not worth the minimal savings. I'm not saying that's your problem, but if I was trying to chase down your issue I would replace the All Balls with OEMs'.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My bearing choice was the first thing that came to mind. I did a bunch of research on this forum with peoples experience with All Balls. It was pretty positive. It wasn't about the cost at all. The All Balls were more readily available and are sealed on both sides which I have been lead to believe is better for keeping contaminates out. The wheel bearing that failed was an OEM bearing with only 20K miles on it.

As far as greasing the new bearings goes I pulled one seal on each bearing and they were packed with blue grease as purchased.
 

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I don't like to use a hammer to install these bearings. Are you sure that the tool you are using is not contacting the inner race as you are driving it in? You want the force / impact to be on the outer race.

I use a 3/4 inch diameter bolt that is long enough to be used as a press to install the bearings. One source for a spacer between the bolt head and new bearing is an old bearing. I remove a few thousands of an inch from the outer race so that when used as a spacer, it fits loosely in the wheel hub. You also need a few large (3/4 inch) washers to complete the setup.

Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't like to use a hammer to install these bearings. Are you sure that the tool you are using is not contacting the inner race as you are driving it in? You want the force / impact to be on the outer race.

I use a 3/4 inch diameter bolt that is long enough to be used as a press to install the bearings. One source for a spacer between the bolt head and new bearing is an old bearing. I remove a few thousands of an inch from the outer race so that when used as a spacer, it fits loosely in the wheel hub. You also need a few large (3/4 inch) washers to complete the setup.

Ron
The tool to install them originally would contact both the inner and outer race. I had a relief cut so that the inner race can't contact the installation tool and then installed them using a press instead of a hammer.

The funny thing is that the bearings were rough after being installed, and after they were removed were smooth again.
 

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The tool to install them originally would contact both the inner and outer race. I had a relief cut so that the inner race can't contact the installation tool and then installed them using a press instead of a hammer.

The funny thing is that the bearings were rough after being installed, and after they were removed were smooth again.
I'm sure you know how to check the bearings but I thought I'd bring it up that if when checking the bearing you are pressing it in towards the hub and turning it and not just pressing lightly down with a fingertip on the outside bearing with pressure towards the tire when rotating it the bearing inner race can rub against the distance collar and feel a bit gritty. I took a wheel into have the bearings replaced and the grey beard tech showed me the bearings were perfectly fine - it was the way I was checking them that made them feel rough. Now, there's no mistaking a bad bearing but since you say the bearings feel good when removed I'd thought I'd throw it out there.

IMG_3601.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have a set of OEM bearings on order. I'll report back after they arrive and are installed.
 

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For 5th gens, with very few exceptions, there is no better parts than OEM parts.
 

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I have a set of OEM bearings on order. I'll report back after they arrive and are installed.
Hopefully you ordered seals too,
 

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The following sequence ifs from my memory so BEWARE, you are responsible to verify by the manual! Your 2012 references front axle and swing arm alignment to the right side. So when you press the bearing sets in you press the right side set in until they are fully seated in the wheel's bearing cup, firmly against the stop ledge. Then the inner race spacer is put in. Then the left side bearing set is pressed in to just make contct with the the inner race spacer. It is best if your bearing press fitting makes equal contact with both the inner and outer race faces. The bearings will feel a little rough if you mash that left side in by the outer race and distort the inner race slightly outward due to it mashing into the inner race spacer. Of course, make sure all surfaces of bearing cups, bearings, spacer, seals, and axle are absolutely clean. Axle should be polished with good paste wax or #2 grease to prevent corrosion, but wipe it down until the coating is just felt, not slathered.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Quick Follow up. I installed the new OEM bearings and everything seems to be fine. There is no roughness or notchiness after installing them like with the aftermarket bearings. The only thing that was done different is that we have a dry ice maker at work. The OEM bearings were were packed in dry ice prior to installation. They shrunk enough to need very little force to press them in place.
 

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For 5th gens, with very few exceptions, there is no better parts than OEM parts.
Any exceptions you want to shout out? Would head bearings be one of them?

After being stranded on a road from bearing failure that I didn't recognize until I couldn't not, I will be buying a set of OEM bearings to carry along with my new bike. To make certain that I never need them. ;)
 

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Quick Follow up. I installed the new OEM bearings and everything seems to be fine. There is no roughness or notchiness after installing them like with the aftermarket bearings. The only thing that was done different is that we have a dry ice maker at work. The OEM bearings were were packed in dry ice prior to installation. They shrunk enough to need very little force to press them in place.
Now that is a cool trick! ;-)

prs
 
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