GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
848 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Being new to the Goldwing (2008 NAV / ABS) I am looking for advice on how and when to use the Pre-load. I have used it to help get the bike up on the center stand. But that is about it. I am 5'9" & 240 lbs. When riding solo on the freeway what do you suggest for the setting? I do notice that when driving surface streets where I put my feet down a lot that having the Pre-load on 0-4 lowers the bike about a 1/4 to 1/2 an inch from when it is on 25 which does help.

Thanks for the advice,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,048 Posts
I'm close enough to your dimensions.

12 for solo riding and 18 for 2-up. The missus weighs 150.

Setting the preload to 0-4 (for me) has me bottoming-out the suspension.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,260 Posts
This is one of those things you need to experiment with yourself. The Gl1800 will definitely drag or hit bottom with the preload set very low (especially two up). I always run mine at 25 pounds for that reason. What someone else does really does not matter... that is why the adjustment is there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
sproing..

I run @ 4 alone. (I am over 260) and 12-14 2 up. (wife is uh, well, Rubenesque ;)) I do run a car tire on rear and it seems to me that anything above 14, the front seems to get too stiff. (Geometry? Imagination?) Different strokes for different folks! Set it where you like it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
Contrary to popular belief, the pre-load adjustment doesn't control compression or rebound damping. Generally speaking, the preload adjustment only changes the ride height. It is intended to compensate for different loads on the bike by adjusting the amount of sag. Suspension 'sag' is the difference between the full 4.1 inches of travel of the rear wheel and the remaining available travel when the bike is fully loaded. A proper sag adjustment will provide aproximately 2/3rds of the remaining travel when fully loaded. You can measure sag, but it requires help from a friend. As a rough guide, if you load the bike with 160lbs, set the per-load at "0". If you load the bike with 250lbs, set it at "25".
:thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
791 Posts
This is one of those things you need to experiment with yourself. The Gl1800 will definitely drag or hit bottom with the preload set very low (especially two up). I always run mine at 25 pounds for that reason. What someone else does really does not matter... that is why the adjustment is there.
I'll second that. The numbers given would only apply if everyones shock oil pump was filled by the same amount. You first have to find out where true zero on the pump is. To do that you start at indicated zero, then raise the setting while listening for the motor to change speed. The point where it changes speed (slows down) is actual zero which is where it starts pushing fluid into the shock and not air.

Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
848 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the advice,

Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
Like Pete says, it will do little good to set your pre-load at a certain number until you know where your hydraulic actuator begins to work. If you find it doesn't engage until 5 or more, there has probably been some loss of hydraulic fluid. If you are interested in fixing this yourself, read this:

http://goldwing.eurekaboy.com/reservoirfill.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
848 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
If I understand the posts I should not get caught up in a number but instead find where I bottom out on a dip and then increase the Pre-load to something higher. As I add weight to the bike increase more. How about on twisties? Does increasing Pre-load give me a "stiffer" ride? From reading previous posts I get the sense not.

Thanks for the imput,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
I agree with running it on 25. I can't tell much if any difference in the height, and I have a 29" inseam. After all, how much time do we normally spend with the bike stopped?

2W
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
I run 9 solo and 22 when we're 2 up. Tried 25 but it didn't feel right.

This is probably one of those things that for every 10 people you're gonna get 15 different preferences. :shrug:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,731 Posts
If I understand the posts I should not get caught up in a number but instead find where I bottom out on a dip and then increase the Pre-load to something higher. As I add weight to the bike increase more. How about on twisties? Does increasing Pre-load give me a "stiffer" ride? From reading previous posts I get the sense not.

Thanks for the imput,
I increase mine with the SO on the back sometimes, and raise it to 25 if I'm going into some twisties to provide more clearance. I haven't really noticed a difference of ride other than not bottoming out. I added a heavier rear shock, and the difference felt by the SO was night and day. My actuator starts working at 0. I usually keep it set somewhere in single-digits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,603 Posts
11-14 if I am solo and laying miles on the slab. 25 if spirited riding or with a passenger/load.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
698 Posts
Contrary to popular belief, the pre-load adjustment doesn't control compression or rebound damping. Generally speaking, the preload adjustment only changes the ride height. It is intended to compensate for different loads on the bike by adjusting the amount of sag. Suspension 'sag' is the difference between the full 4.1 inches of travel of the rear wheel and the remaining available travel when the bike is fully loaded. A proper sag adjustment will provide aproximately 2/3rds of the remaining travel when fully loaded. You can measure sag, but it requires help from a friend. As a rough guide, if you load the bike with 160lbs, set the per-load at "0". If you load the bike with 250lbs, set it at "25".
:thumbup:
Your statements are all 100% correct :thumbup: except for the "rough guidance" at the end. If you measure the sag on a wing you will find that it is way over 1/3 of the travel at "0" even with a light weight solo rider. It usuall takes a setting of 25 to have a chance of getting proper sag with any adult rider. If one is heavy or riding 2 up there is no way to get to 1/3 sag with a stock wing. Thus the advice some have given to put it at 25 for all situations is the best one can do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,323 Posts
If I understand the posts I should not get caught up in a number but instead find where I bottom out on a dip and then increase the Pre-load to something higher. As I add weight to the bike increase more. How about on twisties? Does increasing Pre-load give me a "stiffer" ride? From reading previous posts I get the sense not.

Thanks for the imput,
Gary, when you aggressively ride twisties (if you do) you will find that the hard parts including but not limited to hiway pegs, riders pegs, engine guards, front cowl, and exhaust covers, tend to hit the pavement. One of the benefits of the preload is that in raising the ride height (but doing nothing to the stiffness of the rise) it increases the angle you can lean before depositing expensive chrome on the pavement. This can also increase the fun factor, adrenaline levels and decrease the periodic thumping on the side of the helmet you may experience if your co-rider is like mine. :doorag::excited:

Do what you enjoy.... The preload can help.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top