GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
While flushing the clutch, I was using a vac unit I accidentally let the reservoir get to low and it sucked some air :oops:
Attempting to get all of the air out with the vac unit I had the wife add while I kept sucking it through, I have done this 6 times filling the cup up each time AND I AM STILL GETTING AIR THROUGH THE LINE :evil:
What is the best way to purge all of the air out?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,162 Posts
If you are seeing air bubbles in the mitivac, they may be coming in around the threads of the bleeder valve. Smear some grease around the bleeder valve threrads to seal them then try it again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,447 Posts
If you are seeing air bubbles in the mitivac, they may be coming in around the threads of the bleeder valve. Smear some grease around the bleeder valve threrads to seal them then try it again.
Ditto on that. Also if the hose doesn't fit tight on the bleeder nipple you'll see air bubbles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Since air bubbles naturally tend to rise, I've gotten into the practice of refilling my brake & clutch fluids not from the reservoir downwards, but from the bleeder valve upwards using a large plastic syringe (available at farm supply stores, I think they're used to administer meds to horses) with a length of tubing. I wrap the threads of the bleeder valve with teflon tape to prevent air from getting in.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,396 Posts
You might try pumping the clutch and cracking upen the banjo fitting and bleeding the clutch master cylinder first.

Have plenty of rags around.

What he said!

Seeing you sucked the master dry/empty,You have to fill and bleed the Banjo at the clutch master first!
Then you can go back and start again where you left off at the Clutch slave cyl..

Know you know how important it is to keep the reservoir full when bleed any of the bikes hydraulics..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,865 Posts
And to think that Honda would have us drain the systems first and then refill as a routine procedure!

Before resorting to bleeding just the MC through the banjo fitting, try the old pump with the clutch lever routine. With the bleeder closed, very very slowly depress the lever fully -- hold a couple of seconds, the even more slowly release. This "may" prime the MC, but you will feel no real resistance becasue there is air in the lines below. Now, with a helper open the bleeder and very very slowly depress the lever and hold while your partner closes the bleeder, then very very slowly release the lever. Repeat abut a dozzen times while keeping the reservoir supplied. All of the bubbles should be gone by then, except for that stubborn little bugger that sticks his head out of the bleeder only to retract again -- use the "tap on the bleeder line" method to get him to pop on out.

Do not overfill the clutch reservoir, the level gets higher as the clutch plates wear; just the opposite of brakes.

prs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
Since air bubbles naturally tend to rise, I've gotten into the practice of refilling my brake & clutch fluids not from the reservoir downwards, but from the bleeder valve upwards using a large plastic syringe (available at farm supply stores, I think they're used to administer meds to horses) with a length of tubing. I wrap the threads of the bleeder valve with teflon tape to prevent air from getting in.
That sounds like a GREAT idea!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
467 Posts
A trick I learned on my cb750 front brakes was to tie/bungie/cable tie the lever back to the handle bar and leave it overnight like that. The little bubbles would wind their way up the system and back to the resevoir. It woked great. Try this on your clutch lever.
Cheers,
Cliff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,613 Posts
Honda mcylinders have two holes in the bottom. One is the "feeder" and one is the "bleeder." When we used to change out chrome for stock mc's, we never "bled" the lines. We just topped off the banjo, screwed in the bolt, filled the mc and SLOWLY pulled the lever and SLOWLY released it. You could watch the bubbles come out of the little hole.

Parts shown: #5 is a "hood/baffle" in the bottom of the mc that covers the "bleeder" hole so that fluid exiting does not break the surface of the fluid in the mc causing foam. #10 is a "floating baffle" which serves the same purpose - it keeps the fluid from foaming through splashing.

On your clutch, if the little hole gets plugged up, it will cause the clutch to slip. That was true "back when" and I fixed a few of these using a strand of wire from speaker wire.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Got it! :thumbup:
Thank you all for your suggestions :bow:
I opted to try the easiest first ( putting grease around the bleed valve )
I am sure all the other applications will work as well.
THANKS AGAIN,,,,,,,,,,THIS BOARD ROCKS
:cool:
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
So the question is, why would someone need to flush the clutch? Did a crush washer go bad? Or did they do it because they ran out of :popcorn:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
So the question is, why would someone need to flush the clutch? Did a crush washer go bad? Or did they do it because they ran out of :popcorn:
It is a ritual for some people to flush all the hydraulics every year, or every other year. Like changing the rear end oil with every oil change. I never understood either one of those.

I have never flushed a brake or clutch line in any car or motorcycle I have ever owned, and I had some of them over 20 years. That probably isn't a great idea either, but it probably would be good to find a reasonable interval somewhere in between.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,033 Posts
It is a ritual for some people to flush all the hydraulics every year, or every other year. Like changing the rear end oil with every oil change. I never understood either one of those.

I have never flushed a brake or clutch line in any car or motorcycle I have ever owned, and I had some of them over 20 years. That probably isn't a great idea either, but it probably would be good to find a reasonable interval somewhere in between.
The worst cases I've seen..... where the clutch starts dragging due to not being fully released....(and then works well after the fluid is changed)...
have been on several bikes....that were always parked outside (rain, sun, heat, cold) .
I may be wrong...but I figure that's why they are getting contaminated....
as apposed to the many bikes that don't sit out...and never have problems like this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,865 Posts
My bike is spoiled rotten. It resides in nice warm/dry garage and I do not like to ride in rain or snow, so it does not do much wet duty either. No pressure washers here either. Still, my OE brake fluid was cruddy at 24 months; dark amber with some small jelled clots in the reservoir. The Valvoline replacement fluid was not nearly as cruddy at the next 24 or the next; but I change anyway. The OE clutch fluid was a bit dark, but not bad; but I change cause I'm already doing the brake fluid excanges anyway. The whole routine is quick and painless anyway and opened cans of fluid do not keep, may as well use it.

prs
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
It is a ritual for some people to flush all the hydraulics every year, or every other year. Like changing the rear end oil with every oil change. I never understood either one of those.

I have never flushed a brake or clutch line in any car or motorcycle I have ever owned, and I had some of them over 20 years. That probably isn't a great idea either, but it probably would be good to find a reasonable interval somewhere in between.
Thanks for the reply. Had me wondering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
So the question is, why would someone need to flush the clutch? Did a crush washer go bad? Or did they do it because they ran out of :popcorn:
It's called preventive maintenance :shrug::roll:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I not only believe in preventive maintenance I also live it as a digital copier technician,
An ounce of prevention can save a pound of problems :thumbup:
I have found that Freds....... entertainment videos are a excellent source of information :bow:
The old clutch fluid had this nasty, cloudy rusty looking crap in it as well as so did the breaks fluids
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I not only believe in preventive maintenance I also live it as a digital copier technician,
An ounce of prevention can save a pound of problems :thumbup:
I have found that Freds....... entertainment videos are a excellent source of information :bow:
The old clutch fluid had this nasty, cloudy rusty looking crap in it as well as so did the breaks fluids
I've got my wife tied to a chair and am working her over as we speak. Unfortunately I got laid off and my whip and chains have been reprocessed. :cry: Their she goes giggling at me again. :frown: Fred will have wait to for my money.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top