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I see lots of darksiders use runflats. Is there a reason other than the run flat ability like stiffer sidewalls or something?

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There are many previous threads on the forum with this question.

However, I occasionally carry precious cargo. Higher load rating, better traction, longer life, cheaper price. But the most important - stability and control in a loss of pressure situation. The difference between staying upright and alive versus ....
 

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I see lots of darksiders use runflats. Is there a reason other than the run flat ability like stiffer sidewalls or something?

Thanks
Well,
I'm one of those that goes against the grain. I've mentioned this a few times but never really got any form of an answer. And that is this: If a Run flat is so desired when going darkside, then why don't we see being supplied, or at least asked for, RUN FLAT's on regular motorcycle tires? I mean, if a standard motorcycle rear tire goes flat in any form of rapid air loss, then one is gonna have problems, correct? So why not demand a run flat on the next tire change. I have never seen any nomenclature or sales info on motorcycle run-flat tires.

So, I've been a darksider for years now for oh, maybe 15 years. I'm on my third car tire. Each one has NOT been a run flat. I got 22,000 miles out of my first tire, and around 25,000 on my second one. I just put this new $89 C/T (205 55 16) on my new to us '18 Tour DCT Airbag a month or so ago and it's smooth as glass. Maybe I'm living dangerously or whatever but, I just can't see the need for a run flat when migrating to the darkside. It's all a matter of choice. Run what you feel is appropriate for your bike.
Scott
 
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Well,
I'm one of those that goes against the grain. I've mentioned this a few times but never really got any form of an answer. And that is this: If a Run flat is so desired when going darkside, then why don't we see being supplied, or at least asked for, RUN FLAT's on regular motorcycle tires? I mean, if a standard motorcycle rear tire goes flat in any form of rapid air loss, then one is gonna have problems, correct? So why not demand a run flat on the next tire change. I have never seen any nomenclature or sales info on motorcycle run-flat tires.

So, I've been a darksider for years now for oh, maybe 15 years. I'm on my third car tire. Each one has NOT been a run flat. I got 22,000 miles out of my first tire, and around 25,000 on my second one. I just put this new $89 C/T (205 55 16) on my new to us '18 Tour DCT Airbag a month or so ago and it's smooth as glass. Maybe I'm living dangerously or whatever but, I just can't see the need for a run flat when migrating to the darkside. It's all a matter of choice. Run what you feel is appropriate for your bike.
Scott
IMHO no motorcycle tire manufacturer wants the liability potential of labeling their tire as a run flat.
If you are going to run a car tire, then why wouldn’t you use a run flat?
 

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Run Flats replaced doughnut spares on smaller cars (i.e. Mini Cooper) that were trying to conserve every inch of cargo space and keep weight at a minimum. The doughnuts provide a limp home capability, and say on the side not to exceed xx miles per hour, and not to go further than xx miles. The RF also provides a limp home, but it also a huge safety benefit, since it will stay on the rim, at least till the rider can get pulled over. There's a guy on YT who drilled several holes in the RF tire on his GoldWing, then went for a ride, and the video speaks for itself.

For me, the RF option was what drew me to the dark side, and I feel safer with one on the rear of the GoldWing. I have had several flats / blow outs on motorcycle tires, and some caused more pucker factor than others. You could not pay me to install a NRF. Different strokes.
 

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IMHO no motorcycle tire manufacturer wants the liability potential of labeling their tire as a run flat.
If you are going to run a car tire, then why wouldn’t you use a run flat?
can’t speak to motorcycle usage but most Corvette owners run away from run flats as soon as they can. I know I was happy to see mine go even though C5’s don’t carry a spare. New they are not great but after some wear they are hard as rocks.
 

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can’t speak to motorcycle usage but most Corvette owners run away from run flats as soon as they can. I know I was happy to see mine go even though C5’s don’t carry a spare. New they are not great but after some wear they are hard as rocks.
I had a couple of Toyota Sienna vans that originally came with the Bridgestone Driveguard runflats. They were lousy tires. They rode rough, wore unevenly, had short tread life and were expensive to buy In comparison to other makes. Like you I was happy to see mine go. I replaced them with Michelins. Surprisingly I never had a flat with many thousands of miles of travel with the Michelins and no spare. In hindsight I should have carried a tire repair kit and an air compressor for “just in case,” however my wife was the daily driver and wouldn’t know what to do anyway. She did have an incident with the Bridgestones. It was winter and she was driving north behind a tractor trailer on I-95 In Maine. A slab of ice slid off the roof of the trailer. The ice actually slashed the sidewall of one of the tires. She was able to get safely off the highway and drive to a tire store.
 

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I'll ad to my earlier post now that I have time.
In my earlier Dark Side days I did not use Run Flats. I never even gave it much thought because NON Run Flat tires are lighter, cheaper and easier to mount. But I lost air on the interstate once and was on the side of the highway lying on the ground plugging a tire while cars and trucks were flying by and decided I did not want to deal with that again.
Keep in mind, if you get a flat on the highway you have to stay on the asphalt of the shoulder to get the bike on the center stand or if you only use the side stand the bike may not stay upright due to the flat rear tire. So you are not always as far away from traffic as you want to be....
Just my reasons and my 2 cents.
 

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I'll ad to my earlier post now that I have time.
In my earlier Dark Side days I did not use Run Flats. I never even gave it much thought because NON Run Flat tires are lighter, cheaper and easier to mount. But I lost air on the interstate once and was on the side of the highway lying on the ground plugging a tire while cars and trucks were flying by and decided I did not want to deal with that again.
Keep in mind, if you get a flat on the highway you have to stay on the asphalt of the shoulder to get the bike on the center stand or if you only use the side stand the bike may not stay upright due to the flat rear tire. So you are not always as far away from traffic as you want to be....
Just my reasons and my 2 cents.
So you would rather have the handling of a car tire 100% of the time for something that might happen once or twice in 100,000 miles? I had a flat on the side of I-4 in the dark once so I know exactly the consequences of what you are saying but all my bikes have TPMS now and out of the 10 or so flats I've had in 330,000 miles of riding one was that one on the interstate. If I had TPMS on that bike I wouldn't have even had that experience.
 

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I see lots of darksiders use runflats. Is there a reason other than the run flat ability like stiffer sidewalls or something?

Thanks
I gave my take on this not long ago. Copy and paste job below.

The RF guys know this, but I'll repeat it for the NRF guys. First off, I don't care what tire a guy runs. Everybody is a big boy, but please just be informed. (y)

With a MC tire, the sidewalls are thicker than a NRF. During a rapid air loss (not very common) I'd rather take my chances with a regular old MC tire, then a NRF. If you blow a hole in the sidewall, or lose a valve stem with a NRF, you'll eat sh!t at speed.

You can ride to safety, with a one inch hole in the sidewall with a RF. It's definitely reassuring. I've personally rode a RF with 0 psi at highway speeds, and I didn't go down. The bike felt very stable even. Also, I've rode behind a wing, 2up, pulling a camper with a RF with 0 psi. They rode nearly a 100 miles on that tire.

Also Rail32 has some stickies in the Darkside Riders forum with pictures, they are worth checking out.

So why buy the NRF?

I can think of a few reasons.

Weight- The NRF is 2-6lb lighter than a RF. The P1 RF is 21lb. That's pretty light for a RF. For 99% of riders a few extra lbs of rotating mass, is a non issue.

Cost- NRFs are cheaper.

Availability- Easier to get a NRF at your local tire place. I'm sure they aren't going to have a RF, in the shop. It'll take a day or two to order one in. Not a big deal of course, unless you need a tire in the middle of a trip.
 

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Darksiders use run flats because they have stiff sidewalls. The stiffness is desired (read necessary) to ensure the tire does not wander off the rim and to keep the tire from flexing during cornering. Taxi tires were used initially as they have stiff sidewalls.
 

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A few years ago I had a rear blow-out on my 2008 after hitting a cabbage-sized piece of concrete on an interstate, at night doing 70+ mph. There was an immediate loss of all air in the run-flat tire due to a 4" hole in the sidewall, I just backed off the throttle and easily eased her down to a speed low enough that I could make my exit (next one) and I was able to ride her home another 4 miles. I was very surprised at how well the bike handled while slowing her down, curves were another story. I was really surprised when the next day I looked more closely at the bike and found that the front tire (Batlax) had also deflated and the rim was badly deformed. Both rims and the rear tire were ruined.
 

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So you would rather have the handling of a car tire 100% of the time for something that might happen once or twice in 100,000 miles? I had a flat on the side of I-4 in the dark once so I know exactly the consequences of what you are saying but all my bikes have TPMS now and out of the 10 or so flats I've had in 330,000 miles of riding one was that one on the interstate. If I had TPMS on that bike I wouldn't have even had that experience.

I do not use Car tires JUST for the run flat feature, I was responding to why my car tire choice was a run flat.
My car tire over motorcycle tire is an entirely different conversation.
 
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Well,
I'm one of those that goes against the grain. I've mentioned this a few times but never really got any form of an answer. And that is this: If a Run flat is so desired when going darkside, then why don't we see being supplied, or at least asked for, RUN FLAT's on regular motorcycle tires? I mean, if a standard motorcycle rear tire goes flat in any form of rapid air loss, then one is gonna have problems, correct? So why not demand a run flat on the next tire change. I have never seen any nomenclature or sales info on motorcycle run-flat tires.

So, I've been a darksider for years now for oh, maybe 15 years. I'm on my third car tire. Each one has NOT been a run flat. I got 22,000 miles out of my first tire, and around 25,000 on my second one. I just put this new $89 C/T (205 55 16) on my new to us '18 Tour DCT Airbag a month or so ago and it's smooth as glass. Maybe I'm living dangerously or whatever but, I just can't see the need for a run flat when migrating to the darkside. It's all a matter of choice. Run what you feel is appropriate for your bike.
Scott
If a Run flat Car tire is so desired when going darkside, then why don't we see being supplied, or at least asked for, RUN FLAT's CAR TIRES on regular motorcycle tires? I mean, if a standard motorcycle rear tire goes flat in any form of rapid air loss, then one is gonna have problems, correct? So why not demand a run flat car tire on the next tire change. I have never seen any nomenclature or sales info on motorcycle run-flat car tires.

If you can't understand why people use run flat tires when they decide to run car tires I don't think anyone will be able to explain it to you. Couple pretty good attempts in this thread but...you are bound and determined to be contrary, ("go against the grain").
 
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