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2003 GL1800
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
During my riding time I've had 21 different motorcycles and my 2003 Goldwing is the first that's fuel infected. (At least, that's what I call it. :))

Every carbureted bike has been put away by turning off the petcocks and running the bike with a full tank until it sputters and dies. NO Sta-Bil ever used and they they all started right up in the spring and ran perfectly fine.

Now that my bike has been put to sleep for the year I've doubted my standard procedure as it may not be suitable for a fuel infected machine.

So, my question to the masses is: Is it really necessary to use something like Sta-Bil or should the bike be just fine in the spring without it?
 

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Mixed viewpoints on this. You'll find strong opinions on both sides of the spectrum. But the biggest thing you can do to reduce problems is park it with a full tank. Minimizes the possibility of condensation occuring.

Parking for a few months, nothing is needed. Got a 6+ month hiatus - then some stabil is worthwhile. So is running some techron once-twice a year. But your bike will run for many a year without jumping through hoops - do what feels best for you. And leave the bike off - starting during the winter is hard on the oil and the exhaust system.

Now for me, when I lived in Michigan and Colorado where the bike hibernated from the first road salting till a good spring rain road washing - the bikes all got a full tank, stabil, and run for a bit to ensure the fuel additive made it through the system. Power equipment got some fuel treatment and let the tank run dry - no fuel available to either gum-up or have condensation.
 

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2013 F6B deluxe
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I use stabil, always have. I think regular gas now days last 6 months, no problems. Get it out early and ride it. If you left a 4 month old gas in a tank 1/4 full for the next 6 months, I'd reconsider. Pretty fresh, pretty full, na.
 

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During my riding time I've had 21 different motorcycles and my 2003 Goldwing is the first that's fuel infected. (At least, that's what I call it. :))

Every carbureted bike has been put away by turning off the petcocks and running the bike with a full tank until it sputters and dies. NO Sta-Bil ever used and they they all started right up in the spring and ran perfectly fine.

Now that my bike has been put to sleep for the year I've doubted my standard procedure as it may not be suitable for a fuel infected machine.

So, my question to the masses is: Is it really necessary to use something like Sta-Bil or should the bike be just fine in the spring without it?
Why take the chance, and instead give yourself every advantage you can? Think how you will feel come May when you go to fire it up and enjoy your first ride - and it won't, or it runs like crap. You won't be able to get it serviced quickly b/c of long wait times.
 

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I have never used fuel stabilizer on any of my bikes, never had an issue. I store it in my garage and our winters are not the most extreme in the Pacific Northwest, if that matters.

I do hook it up to a battery tender if it is going to sit for longer than a few weeks.
 

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I haven’t added any Stabil yet. I’m hoping for some more good days to ride, but if they don’t and I don’t get to add fuel stabilizer I won’t lose any sleep over it.
 

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While my bike was down for painting, it sat parked in the garage with 1/2 tank of gas over the winter into spring.

After reassembling, bike started up with single crank of the starter...no Stabil added.

I do, once a year, run full tank of premium gas with octane booster just in case there may be some carbon buildup.
 

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Stabil does zero. Store and hope for the best. Fuel injection much more forgiving for storage. I'll say, despite the conception that modern gas is horrible, it lasts and doesn't turn to crap near like the "good" gas used to, but for sure Stabil does zero good in any way.
I have 8 old Kawasakis that sit for years, and even the ones that didn't sit that long, using Stabil made the carbs clog quicker than using nothing.
 

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I run my carburetor dry from fuel shut-of valves on my lawn mower (I added one), wood chipper, pressure sprayer, and generator and many of those sit for a long while before next use. My chain saw, which sits longer (but 2 stroke) still fires up and I have never put anything in the gas (except the oil for chain saw). But I must confess that the mower is a little difficult to start anytime it is cold, but that is entirely due to no choke. Manually choking it with my hand will fire it up, but not a good idea running with no air filter for warm-up. My bikes are all fuel injected and my Suzuki may sit for a long while and it fires up just fine unless I forget to hook up the solar batter tender. I also had an '06 sit for 9 months while I slowly rebuilt the tranny after doing my real job. It fired right up once I realized I needed to connect the bank angle sensor since the faring was not on yet. So, I am not in the "Sta-bul" camp.
 

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Seafoam, is my "to go too" formula............ Yep I do put it in fuel, whenever I take a long ride and I know that I'll be going through a full tank of gas in a day.............and it's in my fuel as we speak, (yep she's in hibernation, till April 1st

Ronnie
11/20/22
ps: I always put in recommended amount (I read the directions on the side of the can)
 
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During my riding time I've had 21 different motorcycles and my 2003 Goldwing is the first that's fuel infected. (At least, that's what I call it. :))

Every carbureted bike has been put away by turning off the petcocks and running the bike with a full tank until it sputters and dies. NO Sta-Bil ever used and they they all started right up in the spring and ran perfectly fine.

Now that my bike has been put to sleep for the year I've doubted my standard procedure as it may not be suitable for a fuel infected machine.

So, my question to the masses is: Is it really necessary to use something like Sta-Bil or should the bike be just fine in the spring without it?
The topic of the pros and cons of using fuel stabilizers during storage is like asking what oil to use or whether battery maintainers are advisable. Opinions vary.

  • 40-percent of responders will say use a stabilizers, they have and always will
  • 40-percent of responders will say to never use a stabilizer, they never have and never will
  • 70-percent of responders will say whatever you do, you’re wrong
Seriously, I use Sta-bil for winter storage.

BUT, it’s my opinion (I have no factual basis to support this) that fuel injection systems are not susceptible to fuel evaporation like carburetors are and therefore won’t suffer from residue left from evaporation to ‘gum up’ anything. If you fill your gas tank with non-ethanol mixed fuel, that should prevent moisture from contaminating the gas. Finally, a ‘short-ish’ storage period of, say, 3-4 months, shouldn’t be enough time to allow fuel degradation should you not use a stabilzer.

My thoughts. Using something like Sta-bil won’t hurt. Filling your tank with non-ethanol mixed fuel and not using a fuel stabilizer for a short storage period also won’t hurt anything.

Sta-bil is cheap and available. Use it if you can.

Here in Alberta, my bike gets stored with a tank full of non-ethanol and a prescribed dose of Sta-bil, from November to April, or 5-6 months.

Tim
 

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2003 GL1800
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks all for your insights. As suggested earlier, there certainly are two distinct camps for and against the use of stabilizers.

As for me, after being assured that others have stored their rides longer than I plan to and have suffered no I'll effects, I'm just going to keep on doing what I've always done.

To me, whether you choose to use a stabilizer or not, the most important thing to do is to park it with a full tank of gas and leave the bike alone until you're ready to take it out of storage for good. YMMV
 

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2003 GL1800
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I thought petcocks went out of style 20+ years ago!

Use a fuel stabilizer while stored or take a nice cool ride every week.


Sent from my landline using Tapatalk
You're probably right about petcocks. My ride of the last 16 years was a carbureted 2005 HD Road King.
 

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2004
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During my riding time I've had 21 different motorcycles and my 2003 Goldwing is the first that's fuel infected. (At least, that's what I call it. :))

Every carbureted bike has been put away by turning off the petcocks and running the bike with a full tank until it sputters and dies. NO Sta-Bil ever used and they they all started right up in the spring and ran perfectly fine.

Now that my bike has been put to sleep for the year I've doubted my standard procedure as it may not be suitable for a fuel infected machine.

So, my question to the masses is: Is it really necessary to use something like Sta-Bil or should the bike be just fine in the spring without it?
Non ethanol for the last few fill ups before storing and I dont use Stabil.
 

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You are actually LESS likely to have problems with a fuel injected engine than you would with carburetor-ed one. Carburetors are notorious for getting gummed up with old fuel deposits after sitting. Fuel injection is much more forgiving.
 
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