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It is hard to say when Gasoline will go "stale" it depends on a lot of factors such as humidity, temperature and oxygen. The longer the gasoline sits the lighter hydrocarbons will evaporate some of the hydrocarbons will react with oxygen to form gum a solid. Also, some fuel has ethanol in it that is hydrophilic and it will bond with water. At work I have had tests conducted on fuel that is petroleum based and Bio-fuel we made for Gum formation, these were comparison studies. tests were conducted at quarterly intervals and after a year gum formation was not a concern. Since our Bio-fuel does not contain ethanol we did not use any E10 gasoline

the fuel being tested was not kept in a Goldwing in my unheated garage but in a 4-liter amber bottle in a climate-controlled room. I will add a bit of Stabil for peace of mind. just my 2 cents worth
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
You are actually LESS likely to have problems with a fuel injected engine than you would with carburetor-ed one. Carburetors are notorious for getting gummed up with old fuel deposits after sitting. Fuel injection is much more forgiving.
Now that little bit of information will have me sleeping better at night!
 

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Now that you've read all the reviews & opinions (ALL Pro's ~n~ Con's) I bet your more confused than ever on what to do.. :unsure:
I have to ask: What was your decision??
Ronnie
11/24/22
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Now that you've read all the reviews & opinions (ALL Pro's ~n~ Con's) I bet your more confused than ever on what to do.. :unsure:
I have to ask: What was your decision??
Ronnie
11/24/22
After reading all of the opinions I felt reasonably comfortable leaving things as they are for the winter and not worry about the lack of fuel stabilizer. However, after reading Fred Harmon's response where he stated: You are actually LESS likely to have problems with a fuel injected engine than you would with carburetor-ed one." all concerns were gone!

If I hadn't filled the tank right to the top just before storing it, then it would probably be a different matter. At that point, the concern would be all about condensation building up in the tank which would cause issues. As it is a closed system I feel confident that everything will be just fine and dandy when we get back on the road in the spring and I won't miss any ride-to-eats in NH!
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
For me this decision is predicated on how cold, how long, and how much humidity you have in your area......YMMV
I considered this, too, but then thought about all of those lucky snowbirds who leave a car down in Florida for the nine months of the year that they're back home in the North. Bet most of them don't even consider any kind of fuel stabilizer.
 

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During my riding time I've had 21 different motorcycles and my 2003 Goldwing is the first that's fuel infected. (At least, that's what I call it. :))

Every carbureted bike has been put away by turning off the petcocks and running the bike with a full tank until it sputters and dies. NO Sta-Bil ever used and they they all started right up in the spring and ran perfectly fine.

Now that my bike has been put to sleep for the year I've doubted my standard procedure as it may not be suitable for a fuel infected machine.

So, my question to the masses is: Is it really necessary to use something like Sta-Bil or should the bike be just fine in the spring without it?
I have for years on my 2013 F6B, simply filled the tank to the top thus reducing the amount of air (and moisture) to a minumium, and put her to sleep. if you can get 0% ethanol, even better! Of course, there's the year end oil change and wash/cover, too. But no issues ever. No Sta-bil, either.
 

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Several years ago I had gifted my ‘94 Goldwing to my son. Life got in the way of his riding and the bike got parked in my unheated shed. If I remember correctly I added some Stabil to the 10% ethanol gasoline in the fuel tank before putting the bike away. It sat in the shed for a couple of years through the heat and humidity of summers and the freezing cold of winter. My son made a deal with a cousin (my nephew) to give him the bike in exchange for some labor. Before removing the bike from the shed I siphoned out the gasoline from the fuel tank as much as reasonably possible and refilled with fresh gasoline. Some of the old gasoline must have remained in the fuel pump and carburetor. I also bought and installed a new battery. I was pleasantly surprised when the engine started as it always had (2 or 3 attempts) after sitting for awhile. My nephew has enjoyed the bike and uses it frequently on his commutes back and forth to work.

IMHO the size of the fuel passages in a carburetor determine whether or not gunk formation and accumulation will be an issue: the smaller carburetor passages create more issues, such as failure to start or insufficient fuel.
 

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I think I have the best solution. Leave the bike (or trike in Ron's case) and a good gas card in my garage and I will make room for the winter and ensure the gas never goes stale. No charge, just keep your registration and insurance paid up.
 
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I think I have the best solution. Leave the bike (or trike in Ron's case) and a good gas card in my garage and I will make room for the winter and ensure the gas never goes stale. No charge, just keep your registration and insurance paid up.
Such a thoughtful gentleman!!! 🏍
 

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I have been riding in the Pacific Northwest for over 30 years I never was concerned with winter conditions, because I could ride year-round (I have good rain gear). Last year we moved to Wyoming and experienced our first extended, cold winter. I had to purchase a battery tender, make sure the tank was filled with Ethanol free gas, and bike on the lift to keep the tires off the cement. This year was even worst, I had fallen and injured my rotator cup & shoulder so the ability to ride ended sooner than expected. Waiting until springtime.
 
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