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NOW you post that table! Where were you when I was running those numbers through my head on my recent trip from the Frozen North?

If I'd known the wind chill was that bad I would have just given up.

Icedtuna.....having nightmares of ice cubes! :shock:
 

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wind chill

http://www.ncvulcan.org/

go to the above site and at the top of the page click on wind chill and it will take you to a automatic calculator.

Buck
 

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Thanks for the info.

I copied and pasted this to MW and then deleted what I did not want and made copies for my riding buddies here. We were discussing this exact thing last week over coffee (while we were warming up) :lol: :lol:


If we were to ride right now the chill factor for us at 55 MPH would be about -40 deg.. Now way.......LOLOL

Ross
 

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WhiskeryGoofey:

It looks like that chart uses the old wind chill formula. The old wind chill formula was replaced in 2001 with this one:

Wind chill temperature = 35.74 + 0.6215T - 35.75V (**0.16) + 0.4275TV(**0.16)

In the formula, V is in the wind speed in statute miles per hour, and T is the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit. Wind speeds used in the new formula are from winds 5 feet above the ground. The old formula used wind measured at 33 feet, the official height used in weather observations. At 5 degrees with a 30-mph wind, the old formula would calculate a wind chill of minus 40 degrees. The new formulas says the chill would be minus 19 degrees.

The new formula for winds in mph and Fahrenheit temperatures is:

Wind chill temperature = 35.74 + 0.6215T - 35.75V (**0.16) + 0.4275TV(**0.16)

In the formula, V is in the wind speed in statute miles per hour, and T is the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit.

Note: In the formula, ** means the following term is an exponent (i.e. 10**(0.5 ) means 10 to the 0.5 power, or the square root of V), - means to subtract, + means to add. A letter next to a number means to multiply that quantity represented by the letter by the number. The standard rules of algebra apply.

For reference, the old wind chill formula was:

T(wc) = 0.0817(3.71V**0.5 + 5.81 -0.25V)(T - 91.4) + 91.4

Source for both formulas: The National Weather Service
 

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Interesting,but doesn't take into account humidity.
45 dgs. in dry weather feels a whole lot warmer than in damp air.
Also I've found when riding in desert temps,100+,that a light jkt or long sleeved tee shirts make me feel cooler than short sleeves.
Also seems to me that the higher the wind speed in hot weather, the hotter i feel.
For me the most tiring weather to ride in is hot,90+, & hi,90+,humidity.
We have a lot of that here in the S/E/ in July-Aug... :lol:
Oh yeah. IMO 8dgs + or - is a BIG difference to me.
stay safe,
the hobo
 

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I created a spreadsheet using the update equation. I tested a couple of numbers and they match the National Weather Service's calculator. Here's a screen snap:



The updated numbers confirm your suspicions about riding in hot weather. Increased wind actually makes it feel warmer.

The image resolution isn't the best, I'll work on improving it.

Edit: I've increased the font to make it more readable.
 

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That's interesting - I didn't know about the temp increases in the heat.

I rode for a while yesterday when it was between 28 and 32 degrees going 75+ MPH. Testing out the Gerbing's clothing - it passed. :D 8) I think it could be quite a bit colder out and the heated clothing would work fine. I just don't know for sure about my face. When it get's colder I'll test some more. :)
 
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