GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was reading some peoples past posts previously posted(say that 3 times real fast) about loose stem nuts. Would that have any thing to do with the wobble. I put on new stones last Sept. and seem to have more wobble now than I did on the other tires which were stock model dunlops ( my bike is an 01 with about 50000). If so how easy is it to check and has anyone that had the loose nut noticed the change in the wobble after making it tighter? Thanks again guys.
Go Vols
College team of this years Super Bowl MVP Peyton Manning :beer2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,955 Posts
if the nut has not been adjusted in 50,000 miles i bet adjusting will help a bunch because its to loose now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,865 Posts
Yes; improperly loose steering stem bearing pre-load is one of the many factors. Everything else held constant, the change of one factor in the equation (went from brand D tire to brand B tire) would, on the surface, appear logical that that single variable is responsible for any change. But, there are many variables in this equation and many of them are influenced by changes in others. The end result is nearly a can of worms.

In your case, the brand of tire you opted to change to is probably the least trouble prone brand in this wobble mystery. Still, apparently one can get a "bad" tire in any brand (hopefully very rarely). I suspect there may be problem with how the tire seated into its bead seats on the rim. But it could also be balance, or just an odd interaction between that particular treat/carcass design and other factors present on your bike.

I am not certain that there is any sure fire cure. Getting teh tire mount as close to perfect is a good start. Checking the steering stem pre-load with a spring scale may help. Changing to tapered bearings with more inherant dampening typically helps cover the symptom. Changing the suspension or "improving" the suspension is aparently another method with a high success rate.

Riding with both hands on teh wheels is recommended by by some of our contributers as a method of not noticing anything is wrong (the ostrich approach) and that may well be a valid methodology.

prs
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top