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I have a 2009 and have installed the E/C high output cowl lights. I would like to get some yellow lenses for the cowl lights to reduce the glare from them somewhat. I did some experiments a couple of nights ago and found out they were not doing nearly as much to help me see as I thought they were. I sw the yellow lens at WingStuff, but people did not seem to like it very well. Anyone have suggestions for me?
 

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Laminx yellow film

I have a 2009 and have installed the E/C high output cowl lights. I would like to get some yellow lenses for the cowl lights to reduce the glare from them somewhat. I did some experiments a couple of nights ago and found out they were not doing nearly as much to help me see as I thought they were. I sw the yellow lens at WingStuff, but people did not seem to like it very well. Anyone have suggestions for me?
I have a '19 DCT Tour with OEM fog lights.

I had the same issue as you (wanting yellow lens protectors like the ones available for the Clearwater Darlas I had on my '14 BMW R1200RT.)

Some forum member here suggested using yellow film. I did a little online research and discovered Laminx brand film, manufactured specifically for automotive applications to 'convert' white OEM car fog lights into into the preferred for 'real' fog, yellow.

I popped into a local auto window tinting and paint protection film shop and asked if they had a scrap of yellow film I could buy. They gave me an 8" x 12" sheet, free.

It took me (a self-professed technical incompetent) all of 20 minutes to cut 2 circles of film, clean the lenses (with Windex and then rubbing alcohol), and apply the adhesive-backed film.

The only downside is I prefer white light for night riding, but since I rarely do that anymore, it's a non-issue.

Cheapskates out there will love this. Cost, zero. Time to install, 20 minutes. And if you don't like the yellow light, peel the film off.

Tim
 

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I have a '19 DCT Tour with OEM fog lights.

I had the same issue as you (wanting yellow lens protectors like the ones available for the Clearwater Darlas I had on my '14 BMW R1200RT.)

Some forum member here suggested using yellow film. I did a little online research and discovered Laminx brand film, manufactured specifically for automotive applications to 'convert' white OEM car fog lights into into the preferred for 'real' fog, yellow.

I popped into a local auto window tinting and paint protection film shop and asked if they had a scrap of yellow film I could buy. They gave me an 8" x 12" sheet, free.

It took me (a self-professed technical incompetent) all of 20 minutes to cut 2 circles of film, clean the lenses (with Windex and then rubbing alcohol), and apply the adhesive-backed film.

The only downside is I prefer white light for night riding, but since I rarely do that anymore, it's a non-issue.

Cheapskates out there will love this. Cost, zero. Time to install, 20 minutes. And if you don't like the yellow light, peel the film off.

Tim
I used this.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001P2EZFI/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Probably the same that you used. Wasn't free but inexpensive. I have the Show Chrome lights in my '05. Cleaned the glass, applied the film and worked out from the center to get all bubbles out. Able to actually stretch it around the edge of the glass. Then trimmed the excess with an exacto knife.
 

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Call up E/C, they sell them.
 

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I had installed a set of clear fog light lens protectors a while back that seemed to be working, but I liked the look of the yellow fog lights on some other bikes as more of a daytime attention getter. I found a seller on ebay that offers pre-cut 3" acrylic round disks in several colors including translucent yellow. I ordered a pair, added the Dual-Lock fasteners, and swapped them out with my clear ones. I rarely ride at night, so I can't speak for how they perform then, but they do look better to me as daytime driving lights. I am still using the stock H3 bulbs, but am toying with trying a set of CREE LED H3 bulbs.
 

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Some forum member here suggested using yellow film. I did a little online research and discovered Laminx brand film, manufactured specifically for automotive applications to 'convert' white OEM car fog lights into into the preferred for 'real' fog, yellow.

Tim
I lot of people do assume that foglights are supposed to be yellow to be a "real" foglight, but that simply isn't true. In fact, any kind of filter just reduces light output, which reduces their effectiveness.


There are only 2 requirements for effective foglights. Fog does not reach all the way to the ground. If the foglights are mounted low, below the fog line, and the beam from the foglights has a correct low, flat and wide cutoff, the lights will shine on the roadway below the fog line. This will at least help to be able to see where the roadway is and warn oncoming cars. This setup also prevents light from reflecting off the fog and into your eyes. Color doesn't play a part. On a motorcycle foglights lose their effectiveness somewhat since you can't turn off the main headlights to eliminate the reflection.



There of course are some that just think yellow looks cool, or feel that it makes them more visible. To each their own. I guess it all depends on what you are trying to accomplish.
 

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I lot of people do assume that foglights are supposed to be yellow to be a "real" foglight, but that simply isn't true. In fact, any kind of filter just reduces light output, which reduces their effectiveness.


There are only 2 requirements for effective foglights. Fog does not reach all the way to the ground. If the foglights are mounted low, below the fog line, and the beam from the foglights has a correct low, flat and wide cutoff, the lights will shine on the roadway below the fog line. This will at least help to be able to see where the roadway is and warn oncoming cars. This setup also prevents light from reflecting off the fog and into your eyes. Color doesn't play a part. On a motorcycle foglights lose their effectiveness somewhat since you can't turn off the main headlights to eliminate the reflection.



There of course are some that just think yellow looks cool, or feel that it makes them more visible. To each their own. I guess it all depends on what you are trying to accomplish.
Sure.

LarryM is correct. It was my old school thinking that caused me to say 'real fog lights' were yellow.

If one wishes to read a technical explanation of where this 'old school' view that yellow was preferred for fog lights, read about it here: http://www.danielsternlighting.com/tech/lights/light_color/light_color.html

Tim
 

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There are many reasons for Fog lights, color being one of them.

I have Orange / Yellow acrylic covers on them, (it's been so long, I can't remember who) but I purchased them to be "NOTICED".
They have a way of STANDING OUT in the daytime. That's my reason for using them, and they DO WORK WELL.
 

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n9frp, I agree with you.

This thread has strayed far from the OP's original question. As I read it, he was seeking yellow lenses as a means to reduce glare (his words) from his fog lights. I suggested yellow Laminx film, explaining it is used by aftermarket pro shops to convert OEM white auto fog lights to yellow, and incorrectly referenced yellow fog lights as being the preferred, 'real' fog lights. (Testing now shows yellow fog lights are not more effective than white lights) as LarryM pointed out.

I, like you, prefer the yellow or amber fog lights for increased conspicuity. But conspicuity, nor the effectiveness of yellow/amber lenses for fog light, was ever part of the OP's original question, which was trying to reduce glare. Whether a yellow lens filter can even 'reduce glare' of a white light is a question nobody has addressed.

Tim
 

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I bought some of these from Amazon. They simply adhere to your foglights. I am happy with the yellow color/brightness.


Scroll down about 2/3 down the page.



https://www.amazon.com/s?k=yellow+cover+goldwing+fog+light&ref=nb_sb_noss
The yellow/amber Laminex fog light films are a great way to add a level of protection and get that yellow color.

With the loads of fog and rain in the PNW, I'm trying to increase my visibility to oncoming drivers. With the fog I drive through around Seattle's low valleys, the yellow/amber color is more visible. It's also a nice contrast with the white headlights, orange mirror lights and the yellow fog lights, there is more of me to see.

For me, yellow works best:
 

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I have a 2009 and have installed the E/C high output cowl lights. I would like to get some yellow lenses for the cowl lights to reduce the glare from them somewhat. I did some experiments a couple of nights ago and found out they were not doing nearly as much to help me see as I thought they were. I sw the yellow lens at WingStuff, but people did not seem to like it very well. Anyone have suggestions for me?
I'd leave 'em as is, for this reason

I lot of people do assume that foglights are supposed to be yellow to be a "real" foglight, but that simply isn't true. In fact, any kind of filter just reduces light output, which reduces their effectiveness.


There are only 2 requirements for effective foglights. Fog does not reach all the way to the ground. If the foglights are mounted low, below the fog line, and the beam from the foglights has a correct low, flat and wide cutoff, the lights will shine on the roadway below the fog line. This will at least help to be able to see where the roadway is and warn oncoming cars. This setup also prevents light from reflecting off the fog and into your eyes. Color doesn't play a part. On a motorcycle foglights lose their effectiveness somewhat since you can't turn off the main headlights to eliminate the reflection.



There of course are some that just think yellow looks cool, or feel that it makes them more visible. To each their own. I guess it all depends on what you are trying to accomplish.
 

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There are many reasons for Fog lights, color being one of them.

I have Orange / Yellow acrylic covers on them, (it's been so long, I can't remember who) but I purchased them to be "NOTICED".
They have a way of STANDING OUT in the daytime. That's my reason for using them, and they DO WORK WELL.

:agree:
I installed the yellow protectors to increase viability. They break up the white light pattern and I have been told they make people look again. Mission accomplished.
 

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Read somewhere that the best light for penetration in fog on the front of a vehicle is toward the longer wavelengths/ lower frequency light at the low or red end of the spectrum.


Not usable for obvious reasons.
 

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The reason for using yellow on fog lights was to reduce bounce back glare that is caused by light in the blue spectrum. When you're shining light in the fog, much if it will be reflected back, and the light in the blue spectrum is what causes the perceived glare. Yellow light "appears" to penetrate better, simply because the blue is filtered out, so you aren't fighting against the reflected glare to see.


It also helps with oncoming drivers depth perception of an approaching vehicle. A vehicle with lights shifted toward the blue spectrum is harder to distinguish the distance of more than a vehicle approaching with yellowish lights. So while yellow lights may not make you more "visible", it will help drivers better estimate your distance and approach speed to them.
 

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The reason for using yellow on fog lights was to reduce bounce back glare that is caused by light in the blue spectrum. When you're shining light in the fog, much if it will be reflected back, and the light in the blue spectrum is what causes the perceived glare. Yellow light "appears" to penetrate better, simply because the blue is filtered out, so you aren't fighting against the reflected glare to see.


It also helps with oncoming drivers depth perception of an approaching vehicle. A vehicle with lights shifted toward the blue spectrum is harder to distinguish the distance of more than a vehicle approaching with yellowish lights. So while yellow lights may not make you more "visible", it will help drivers better estimate your distance and approach speed to them.
A lot of what I've read about, much of which has been echoed by several posters above, makes me want to try a yellow film on my '14 Valkyrie headlight. I am no longer legally allowed to ride after sundown (I already knew I couldn't see at night anymore and hadn't been able to nor wanted to for 4-5 years, but now it's an official State of Illinois assessment), so a lot of things I'd have done in the past, e.g. installing fogs for extra visibility (both ways, me/them, them/me), don't apply as much. I am now more interested in just being seen.

Question: is applying the yellow film on a single motorcycle headlight legal in all states? What about mine (IL)? Even for just daytime riding? Thanks for any knowledgeable advice!
 

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Like others, I went yellow to be noticed better. I used LaminX on the cars; on my Gold Wing I just used a yellow tint spray; about 4 or 5 coats. Worked fine; made the bike more visible during the day (I seldom ride at night). YRMV
 

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The yellow/amber Laminex fog light films are a great way to add a level of protection and get that yellow color.

With the loads of fog and rain in the PNW, I'm trying to increase my visibility to oncoming drivers. With the fog I drive through around Seattle's low valleys, the yellow/amber color is more visible. It's also a nice contrast with the white headlights, orange mirror lights and the yellow fog lights, there is more of me to see.

For me, yellow works best:
Seattle also, I never ride with out my Clearwaters on (low) and my foglights. Dangerous city to drive/ride in.
 
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